NASA orbiter discovers double crater left by mysterious booster that crashed in March

NASA published images of a massive crater left by a “mystery rocket” that crashed into the Moon in March.

The newly released photos were taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), NASA’s robotic spacecraft currently orbiting the Moon, on May 25.

They show an amazing “double crater” about 92 feet (28 meters) wide near the Hertzsprung crater on the far side of the Moon.

An American explorer found a rocket body flying towards the moon in January before it crashed into the moon on March 4, but its identity is still unknown.

It is said to be a spent rocket booster from a launch many years ago, but neither China nor the US will claim responsibility for it.

See where the rocket hit the moon? An impact crater formed by a mysterious rocket booster in March was discovered by NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Can you spot it? This GIF shows the location of a newly formed double crater. The previous image is a view of the LRO from February. 28, 2022(M1400727806L). Image after May 21, 2022. The frame width is 367 meters, about 401 yards.

WHAT’S HAPPENED?

In January, American explorer Bill Gray discovered that a mysterious rocket was on an accelerated course towards the moon.

Gray originally thought it was a SpaceX rocket launch booster in February 2015.

However, NASA has stated that the object was likely the launch vehicle of China’s Chang’e 5-T1 mission launched in October 2014. China denied this.

The rocket hit the moon on March 4, 2022 near the Hertzsprung crater, creating a double crater approximately 92 feet (28 meters) wide at its longest dimension.

Mark Robinson, professor of earth and space science at Arizona State University, said the object weighed about four tons and was moving at 5,700 miles per hour before impact.

Mark Robinson, professor of earth and space science at Arizona State University, said the object weighed about four tons and was moving at 5,700 miles per hour before impact.

NASA has shared images of the resulting crater taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC), a system of three cameras mounted on the LRO.

“The identification of the rocket body remains unclear,” NASA said.

“The double crater was unexpected and may indicate that the rocket body had large masses at each end.”

Because the origin of the rocket body remains unclear, the dual nature of the crater could help determine its identity, the space agency said.

Surprisingly, the crater is composed of two craters – the eastern crater, 59 feet (18 meters) in diameter, superimposed on the western crater, 52 feet (16 meters) in diameter.

NASA has stated that no other rocket impacts on the Moon in history have caused a double crater, although there are larger man-made craters on the Moon.

The impact craters formed during the four Apollo missions in the 1970s were significantly larger (over 115 feet) than either of the twin craters.

Back in January, the “mystery rocket” was initially identified by Bill Gray, an independent researcher and developer of astronomical software Project Pluto.

In the new Blog PostGray said he was “a bit puzzled” by the dual nature of the impact crater.

“I am by no means an expert on what happens in such high-speed collisions, other than that I know they can lead to very strange, non-intuitive results,” he said.

The rocket body impacted the lunar surface on March 4, 2022 near the Hertzsprung crater, creating a

The rocket body impacted the lunar surface on March 4, 2022 near the Hertzsprung crater, creating a “double crater” approximately 92 feet (28 meters) wide at its longest dimension.

An amazing

An amazing “double crater” about 92 feet (28 meters) wide formed near Hertzsprung Crater on the far side of the Moon. The new crater is not visible in this image, but its location is indicated by the white arrow. Mosaic LROC WAC 110 kilometers wide.

Back in January, before the impact, Gray thought the object was a booster for a SpaceX rocket in February 2015 that sent a weather and Earth observation satellite called DSCOVR into orbit for NASA.

However, NASA said its analysis indicated that the object was likely the launch vehicle of the Chinese Chang’e 5-T1 mission launched in October 2014 from the Xichang Cosmodrome, Xichang, China.

It was rejected a Chinese foreign ministry spokesman who said China’s aerospace efforts are “always in line with international law”.

China launched the uncrewed Chang’e 5-T1 spacecraft to the Moon on a Long March 3C rocket, a three-stage Chinese rocket with two attached liquid rocket boosters.

The pictures taken by LRO (pictured) were taken in mid-August but only recently released.

The pictures taken by LRO (pictured) were taken in mid-August but only recently released.

The purpose of the mission was to test the ability of the spacecraft capsule to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere.

That same month, the capsule landed back on Earth, but US authorities believed the booster had floated in space for more than seven years before heading for the moon.

Regardless of its identity, the impact course has re-ignited debate about space debris and who is legally responsible for tracking space debris floating outside of Earth’s atmosphere.

According to NASA, there is about 23,000 pieces more of a softball revolving around the earth.

In 2021 European Commission expert warned that the unwanted debris left behind by humans in low Earth orbit has become the equivalent of a “new drifting plastic island”.

IN JANUARY 2022, RUSSIAN ANTI-SATELLITE ROCKET TEST PASSED 47 FEET FROM CHINA SCIENCE SATELLITE QINGHUA, BEIJING SAID

Space debris from a test of a Russian anti-satellite missile was within 47 feet (14.5 meters) of being hit. ChinaTsinghua science satellite this week, Beijing said in January.

According to the China National Space Administration (CNSA), based on tracking data, the China National Space Administration (CNSA) reported that the collision between Tsinghua and debris 49863 occurred at 02:49 GMT on January 18.

According to CNSA, the two objects passed each other at a relative speed of over 11,700 miles per hour.

RussiaThe wreckage came from the 4,410-pound Cosmos 1408 satellite, which the country destroyed in November during an “anti-satellite missile test.”

Kosmos-1408 was launched in 1982 and was deliberately destroyed by the Russians because it was no longer operational.

Tsinghua is a Chinese university research payload launched into orbit in August 2020 aboard the Long March 2D rocket.

Read more: Russian space debris found 47 feet from downed Chinese satellite