People born into a family are more sensitive to the plight of the poor than people from humble families.

People born with money are MORE sensitive to the plight of the poor than those who have gone from rags to riches, study says.

  • People who have risen from poverty to riches have less sympathy for the poor.
  • The researchers suggest that this may be because they perceive social mobility as easier.
  • The study contradicts the popular belief that being from a privileged background makes you more indifferent to the economic situation of others.

People who have risen from poverty to riches often boast of their humble origins, and it can be assumed that they will be more sensitive to the plight of the poor than those who were born rich.

But a new study shows that people who have gone from “low to rich” are less likely to be sympathetic to fighting poverty than those who have always had money.

The researchers surveyed more than 1,000 people in the US and found that those who have climbed the economic ladder tend to find social mobility easier than those who were born rich.

As a result, they had less sympathy for those who could not follow them.

This goes against the popular belief that coming from a privileged position makes you more indifferent to the economic position of others.

The news comes after Prince William was photographed earlier this month selling copies of the Big Issue to draw attention to homelessness.

Prince William (pictured with Big Issue salesman Dave Martin) recently “went undercover” as a Big Issue salesperson to shed light on homelessness.

Rich people are more likely to be mean

Rich people are more often evil, like the character Ebenezer Scrooge in Charles Dickens’ A. Christmas Carol, according to a new study that shows people from poorer backgrounds are more likely to be kind, like Tiny Tim and his family.

Analyzing data from 46,000 people in 67 countries, including information on wealth and levels of morality and moral behavior, helped a team from Agder University in Kristiansand, Norway, make their discovery.

This study shows that Disney films, as well as imagery in classic literature, stand up to scrutiny, as lack of wealth is associated with higher moral standards.

While the link was relatively weak, it was an important finding, according to the researchers, who said poorer people were more likely to give to charity and help.

“There are all sorts of stories and cultural narratives about the rich, who they are and how they behave,” said study lead author Hyunjin Koo of the University of California.

“Our results show that not all rich people may be the same. What seems to matter is how they got rich.”

The team conducted five different studies as part of their study.

The first survey surveyed 736 people in the US and found that people had more positive attitudes toward “get rich” than “born rich” and expect to be more supportive of the poor and provide social security.

A second study showed that this was true despite being told how hardworking the people in the two wealthy groups were.

The researchers conducted two more surveys of 1,032 wealthy people with an annual income of $80,000 in one study and $142,501 in another.

It was here that they found that those who got richer found social mobility easier and therefore less sympathetic to those unable to change their predicament.

In the latest study, researchers asked 492 people to imagine themselves in a hypothetical company.

They were randomly divided into two groups: in one, participants rose through the ranks, and in the other, people received top positions from the very beginning.

The results showed that members of the ascending mobile group thought it was easier for them to move forward and therefore had less empathy for those who were still struggling.

“Just because someone was in your shoes doesn’t necessarily mean they care about you,” Mr Koo said.

“Overcoming a certain difficulty may, by its very nature, make people less sympathetic towards those experiencing the same difficulty because they have overcome it.”

The study found that people who were born rich were more likely to sympathize with the plight associated with fighting poverty than those who were once poor themselves.

The study found that people who were born rich were more likely to sympathize with the plight associated with fighting poverty than those who were once poor themselves.

The researchers surveyed more than 1,000 people in the US and found that those who have climbed the economic ladder tend to find social mobility easier than those who were born rich.

The researchers surveyed more than 1,000 people in the US and found that those who have climbed the economic ladder tend to find social mobility easier than those who were born rich.

The researchers said it was too early to draw any definitive conclusions about how upward mobility affects people’s thinking, saying more research is needed.

“There are probably a lot of rich people who don’t fit the patterns that we document, who are sympathetic to the poor and social welfare,” Mr Koo said.

“We show major trends, but there will likely be many exceptions to the patterns we document.”

He added that the study suggests that people should consider the cultural narratives surrounding the two wealthy groups, and that social mobility may have unexpected social disadvantages that make those who succeed less empathetic towards others who struggle.

He also said he would like to do more research on how race and gender might influence this perception, and to do similar surveys outside of the US.

The study was published in the journal Social psychology and the science of personality.

PRINCE WILLIAM ‘WORKING UNDERCOVER’ AS A BIG SELLER TO SHOW A LIGHT ON HOMELESSNESS

Earlier this month, the Duke of Cambridge stunned passers-by when he went undercover to help sell a weekly magazine special to mark his 40th birthday.

He sold 32 copies of the Grand Edition in less than an hour after spending a day on the streets of Victoria in London.

Prince William also wrote for the magazine, explaining that he wanted to shed light on the problem of homelessness, remembering the first time he visited a homeless shelter with his mother, the Princess of Wales. He added that Diana “in her own inimitable style was determined to shed light on a forgotten, misunderstood issue.”

He even said he plans to take his children Prince George, eight, Princess Charlotte, seven, and Prince Louis, four, to see the work of the “fantastic” organizations he works with, “just like my mother did for me”.

On Twitter, he said: “I have always believed that my platform will help draw attention and take action to those who are struggling, and I commit to do everything possible to bring attention to this problem being solved, not only today, but in the coming months. . coming years.”