Two thousand year old human remains found at an Iron Age site in Dorset.

The remains of five 2,000-year-old humans have been found buried in a crouched position along with sacrificed animals at a recently discovered Iron Age settlement in Dorset.

The site, which includes round houses and storage pits, was discovered by archeology students at Bournemouth University last September.

It was named Duropolis because the once bustling farming settlement, dating back to around 100 BC and well before the Roman invasion of Britain, is believed to have been occupied by the Durotrige tribe.

For the past three weeks, a team of 65 university students have been excavating at Winterbourne-Kingston.

During this time, they discovered the bodies of women and men, as well as animal parts, in storage pits that were originally used to store grain.

The bodies were found in crouched positions in oval-shaped pits and were buried along with joints of meat and clay bowls that originally contained drinks “for the afterlife,” which experts believe was the way a group of people gave their dead a way to walk. to another place”.

This crouched burial position was the standard practice of the period. It began in the Bronze Age and continued until the Iron Age.

“Burial at Winterbourne Kingston – lying on your side with your limbs tucked in – was the practice of durothrigs at the time, and they were buried in a shroud along with some offerings for the afterlife,” said Damian Evans, demonstrator in field archeology and collections at Bournemouth University.

Excavations: Two thousand year old human remains and sacrificed animals have been found at a recently discovered Iron Age settlement in Dorset.

The bodies were found in crouched positions in oval-shaped pits and were buried along with meat joints and clay bowls originally containing drinks.

The bodies were found in crouched positions in oval-shaped pits and were buried along with meat joints and clay bowls originally containing drinks.

The site, which includes round houses and storage pits, was discovered by archeology students at Bournemouth University last September.

The site, which includes round houses and storage pits, was discovered by archeology students at Bournemouth University last September.

Experts say the discovery of prehistoric people who lived at the site, as well as items from their daily lives, provides interesting new insights into Iron Age lifestyles.

“We know a lot about life in Britain during and after the Roman invasion because so much was recorded,” said Dr Miles Russell of Bournemouth University.

“But we don’t have anything written about life before, the answers to questions about how they lived come solely from what we find in the earth.”

Groups of students and university staff have been engaged in exploration and excavation in the area for several years.

In 2015, they completed excavations of a large Iron Age city, which they named “Duropolis” after the Durotrig tribes that lived in the region.

The settlement they’re working on today is about half a mile north of Duropolis.

Archaeologists hope the new discoveries will help them better understand the religious practices in the communities of the time.

“The animal remains that we find at the bottom of the pits would have served as food for this settlement for several weeks, so burying so much in the ground is a significant sacrifice to their gods,” Dr. Russell said.

For the past three weeks, a group of 65 university students have been excavating at Winterbourne-Kingston.

For the past three weeks, a group of 65 university students have been excavating at Winterbourne-Kingston.

During this time, they discovered the bodies of women and men, as well as animal parts (pictured) in storage pits that were originally used to store grain.

During this time, they discovered the bodies of women and men, as well as animal parts (pictured) in storage pits that were originally used to store grain.

Experts say the discovery of prehistoric people who lived at the site, as well as items from their daily lives, provides interesting new insights into Iron Age lifestyles.

Experts say the discovery of prehistoric people who lived at the site, as well as items from their daily lives, provides interesting new insights into Iron Age lifestyles.

“In some pits, animal parts were placed on other animals and together with them, for example, we found the head of a cow on the body of a sheep.

“We don’t know why they did it, it’s frankly weird to us, but it’s an exciting new look at their belief systems.”

Archeology student Nathan Sue cleaned and preserved finds from the settlement, including pottery, animal bones, and jewelry.

“Some of the most exciting finds we unearthed during the excavation include a ring we found on someone’s finger in a related burial,” he said.

“It’s a copper alloy, possibly bronze, and it’s nice to find that rings from this century aren’t common.”

Groups of students and university staff have been studying and excavating sites in the area for several years.

Groups of students and university staff have been studying and excavating sites in the area for several years.

The excavation will continue for another week and the human bone will be analyzed at Bournemouth University before it is returned to the ground.

The excavation will continue for another week and the human bone will be analyzed at Bournemouth University before it is returned to the ground.

The team will then continue to explore and scan the East Dorset area for further settlement activity, which they hope may reveal more secrets of life in pre-Roman Britain.

The team will then continue to explore and scan the East Dorset area for further settlement activity, which they hope may reveal more secrets of life in pre-Roman Britain.

Another archaeology student from Bournemouth, Sarah Elliot, who was part of the excavation team, said: “We learned that people who lived here two thousand years ago filled these storage pits with their garbage, and we found pottery, bones, coal and flint.

“We know they buried their dead here and all of their limbs are articulated so they were placed in the ground with care and they bury their dead in a very special way so that they can be easily identified.”

The excavation will continue for another week and the human bone will be analyzed at Bournemouth University before it is returned to the ground.

The team will then continue to explore and scan the East Dorset area for further settlement activity, which they hope may reveal more secrets of life in pre-Roman Britain.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT IRON AGE Britain?

The Iron Age in Britain began at the same time as the end of the Bronze Age.

It began around 800 BC. and ended in 43 AD when the Romans invaded.

As the name suggests, massive changes took place during this period due to the introduction of iron processing technology.

During this period, the population of Britain probably exceeded one million.

This was made possible by new forms of farming, such as the introduction of new varieties of barley and wheat.

The invention of the iron-tipped plow made it possible for the first time to cultivate crops in heavy clay soils.

Some of the major advances of the time included the introduction of the potter’s wheel, the lathe (used for woodworking), and the rotary grain grinder.

There are about 3,000 Iron Age sites in Great Britain. Some were used as permanent settlements, others were used as places of assembly, trade and religious activities.

At that time, most people lived in small farms with large families.

The standard house was round, wood or stone, with a thatched or sod roof.

Burial practices varied, but apparently most people were disposed of by “ecarnation”, that is, they were deliberately left unprotected.

From this period, some bog bodies have also been preserved, which show traces of violent death in the form of ritual and sacrificial murders.

By the end of this period, Roman influence from the western Mediterranean and southern France increased.

It appears that prior to the conquest of England by the Romans in 43 AD. they had already established links with many tribes and could exercise some political influence.

After 43 AD all of Wales and England below Hadrian’s Wall became part of the Roman Empire, while Iron Age life in Scotland and Ireland lasted longer.