Leaving this summer? Be sure to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning

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After the recently confirmed death of three American tourists from carbon monoxide (CO). at the Sandals Resort in the Bahamasexperts are weighing ways to prevent exposure to carbon monoxide poisoning during travel and vacations this summer.

Carbon monoxide is especially dangerous because it is odorless. People do not realize they are being exposed until they have symptoms.

Health Experts recommend installing carbon monoxide detectors in homes, rental apartments, hotel rooms, etc. know and verify that they are actually located there and fully functional during any vacation, no matter how short or long.

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Not all states in the US or all countries require carbon monoxide detectors to be installed in hotel rooms, rental apartments, or homes.

It is the responsibility of travelers to check and confirm whether the holiday destinations have detectors or not.

Robbie and Michael Phillips were found dead on May 6 at Sandals Emerald Bay in Great Exuma, Bahamas.  Samples taken from the couple and a Florida resident who also died were sent to a US lab for testing.

Robbie and Michael Phillips were found dead on May 6 at Sandals Emerald Bay in Great Exuma, Bahamas. Samples taken from the couple and a Florida resident who also died were sent to a US lab for testing.
(Facebook/Thesandalslady)

At the Sandals Resort, where three people died of carbon monoxide poisoning, no CO detectors were installed as it was not a mandatory rule, Fox News Digital previously reported.

The resort released a statement saying: “Carbon monoxide detectors are now installed in all rooms at the Sandals Emerald Bay Hotel and while this is not required Caribbean Destination where we operate, detectors will be installed in all guest rooms throughout the portfolio.”

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According to a study published in Preventive Medicine Reports in 2019, carbon monoxide in hotels is an issue travelers should be aware of.

The authors of this study found that from Jan. December 1, 2005 to Dec. On December 31, 2018, more than 900 guests traveling across the US were poisoned in 115 reported incidents, including 22 fatalities. The study states that the types of housing that had odorless gas included hotels, motels and resorts of all classes and were located in most states.

Vacationers should be aware of the potential carbon monoxide hazard in a rented apartment, rented home, or hotel, given that state and country regulations vary.

The researchers found that most of the poisonings were caused by natural gas-powered appliances and, according to a published study, they could probably have been prevented if a carbon monoxide alarm had been installed in the room.

They suggested that the government install carbon monoxide detectors (similar to smoke detectors) in rooms to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with carbon monoxide.

One home inspector advised travelers to take carbon monoxide detectors with them when they go on vacation or on a trip.

One home inspector advised travelers to take carbon monoxide detectors with them when they go on vacation or on a trip.
(iStock)

Bobby Davidson, President of HomePro Chesapeake Inc. in Annapolis, Maryland, provides home inspection and environmental testing services for homes and buildings. Davidson told Fox News Digital in an interview this week that it’s important for vacationers to be aware of the potential dangers of carbon monoxide in a rented apartment, rented house, or hotel, given that government regulations vary.

“For example, Maryland does not require a carbon monoxide detector in the home,” Davidson said. “So if you’re planning a vacation on the Maryland coast, you should be aware that state requirements may not require a CO detector to be installed at that particular rental property.”

“The detectors are small enough to pack in a bag and typically cost less than $30,” said Bobby Davidson of HomePro Chesapeake Inc. in Annapolis, Maryland.

One way to avoid potential carbon monoxide poisoning, according to Davidson, is to include a carbon monoxide detector in the things you take with you before you travel.

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“The detectors are small enough to pack in a bag and typically cost less than $30,” he said.

Davidson even advised taking two detectors with him – and placing one on the lower level of the rented house, and the other near the sleeping area.

For those traveling overseas, where electrical outlets may differ from those in the US, vacationers should consider using a battery-powered device, Davidson said. Either that, or order one with the right socket type.

Aerial view of the Bahamas.  Travelers should ask very specific questions about carbon monoxide detectors, a home inspection specialist advised.

Aerial view of the Bahamas. Travelers should ask very specific questions about carbon monoxide detectors, a home inspection specialist advised.

The home inspector also advised travelers to ask hotel or rental managers the following questions and discuss these issues:

one. Are gas appliances such as water heaters and stoves working?

2. Is the fireplace gas-operated and properly ventilated? (Davidson also said that people should never turn on a gas fireplace while they sleep.)

3. Was a carbon monoxide sensor installed, and if so, when was it last checked?

four. Are any generators used indoors or at least partially indoors? (They shouldn’t be.)

When renting a country house, it is important to check the condition of the property with licensed professionals.

He also said that for vacationers who can’t get or don’t have enough information about the house or apartment they’re renting, it’s best to bring a mains or battery-powered CO detector with them.

Also, he said, never, ever leave a car running in a garage.

Officials from Moorhead, Minnesota appeared at the December 1 press conference.  February 22, 2021 to tell about the death of seven residents who died from carbon monoxide poisoning.  The carbon monoxide detector in the garage was removed and replaced with a smoke-only detector, but investigators found no evidence of criminal activity.

Officials from Moorhead, Minnesota appeared at the December 1 press conference. February 22, 2021 to tell about the death of seven residents who died from carbon monoxide poisoning. The carbon monoxide detector in the garage was removed and replaced with a smoke-only detector, but investigators found no evidence of criminal activity.
(AP Photo/Dave Kolpak)

Jennifer McCormick, a licensed real estate professional in Annapolis, Maryland with Engel & Völkers, told Fox News Digital that when country house rentalit is important to check the condition of the property with licensed professionals.

“Make sure the home you rent must have all the security features required by law,” she said. “Carbon monoxide is a deadly hazard and some rental companies may have in their contracts that they are not responsible for the condition of the property.”

“It’s also important to make sure that furniture and curtains don’t block the detectors and that there are enough detectors approved by licensed experts.”

McCormick also noted that it is important for the rental agency to make sure that necessary areas, including sleeping areas, have smoke and carbon monoxide detectors installed.

“It’s also important to make sure that furniture and curtains don’t block the detectors and that there are enough detectors approved by licensed experts,” McCormick added.

The real estate specialist also said that if there is a hearing-impaired person in the family, it is reasonable to ask if the apartment has an alarm system with flashing lights, or ask if they can provide one.

“Because you don’t smell or see carbon monoxide, it’s extremely important to take appropriate action and ask these important questions before signing anything,” McCormick said.

Dr. Fred Davis, DO, MPH, a board certified emergency physician at Northwell Health in Long Island, NY, recently spoke with Fox News about carbon monoxide poisoning. Davis said: “Carbon monoxide replaces oxygen with hemoglobin, the oxygen carrier in our blood, and prevents oxygen from entering cells. This leads to headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting and confusion.”

The doctor emphasized the importance of seeking medical attention if you suspect you have been exposed to carbon monoxide poisoning.

He added that if a person stays in the affected area, they could lose consciousness and even die.

Davis also said: “If you are in a place where fuels are burning (even some kitchen appliances such as stoves or water heaters, and car exhausts) and you have these symptoms, the first thing to do is get out of the house. square”.

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Davis added: “Being able to get out into the open, away from such objects, can help relieve mild symptoms.”

The doctor emphasized the importance of seeking medical attention if you suspect you have been exposed to carbon monoxide poisoning.