“Looks like we got into Stranger Things: a ghostly green sky appeared over Sioux Falls

“Looks like we’re in Stranger Things: a ghostly green sky appeared over Sioux Falls after a storm with winds up to 150 km/h swept through the city

  • The energy derecho hit several Midwestern states on Tuesday, including South Dakota.
  • Residents of Sioux Falls were shocked when hauntingly green skies rolled into the area.
  • Derecho is a strong gale associated with a fast moving group of severe thunderstorms.
  • This violent storm brought winds up to 99 mph, cutting off power to thousands of people in the area.

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Sioux Falls residents North Dakota as if they were in an episode Netflix series’very strange things‘when the sky turned hauntingly green on Tuesday.

The National Weather Service (NWS) reported that this was not due to a tornado, as some believed, but due to a derecho.

Derecho is a strong gale associated with a fast moving group of severe thunderstorms.

This one in particular blew through the northern Midwest with winds up to 99 mph that cut power for thousands.

Isaac Longley, meteorologist for AccuWeather, told DailyMail.com: “While such green skies are quite common, especially on the plains, the sky associated with the severe storms that hit Sioux Falls on the afternoon of July 5 seemed even greener than usual.

“Of course, it caught the attention of many who had never seen such a green sky.”

“In this particular case, the green sky lasted for about 10-20 minutes as the storm approached the city of Sioux Falls.”

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Residents of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, felt like they had stepped into an episode of Netflix’s Stranger Things when the sky turned hauntingly green on Tuesday.

The storm hit Sioux Falls from approximately 3:00 pm to 3:30 pm CST, bringing muddy green skies with it.

The storm died down around 5:30 pm, by which time more than 26,000 people in the city were without power.

Crews are assessing damage across the city, and several areas are expected to be restored by 10 p.m. Wednesday, according to an Xcel Energy blackout map.

“Thunderstorms tend to happen later in the day due to the fact that solar power during the day helps them feed,” Longley explained to DailyMail.com.

The National Weather Service (NWS) reported that this was not due to a tornado, as most believed, but due to a derecho.  Derecho is a major hurricane associated with a fast moving group of severe thunderstorms.

The National Weather Service (NWS) reported that this was not due to a tornado, as most believed, but due to a derecho. Derecho is a major hurricane associated with a fast moving group of severe thunderstorms.

“As many of us know, the sun appears redder in the late afternoon as it approaches the horizon. However, the light under a high thundercloud appears blue due to scattering by water droplets.

“When the blue light is illuminated by the red light of the setting sun, it appears green, which is why some thunderstorms have that greenish tint.”

Residents have been sharing images and videos of the storm, some comparing it to the upside down scene in Stranger Things or the Emerald City scene in The Wizard of Oz.

Isaac Longley, meteorologist for AccuWeather, told DailyMail.com:

Isaac Longley, meteorologist for AccuWeather, told DailyMail.com: “While such green skies are quite common, especially on the plains, the sky associated with the severe storms that hit Sioux Falls on the afternoon of July 5 seemed even greener than usual.

The derecho stretched from South Dakota to Illinois, causing flooding in the Midwest.

By definition, if a wind damage strip extends more than 240 miles and includes wind gusts of at least 58 miles per hour (93 km/h) or higher for most of its length, then the event can be classified as a derecho. the NWS website. states.

Some of the highest total rainfall was in Indiana, with six inches in Fort Wayne and nearly eight inches in Huntertown.

And in Timber Lake, South Dakota, residents reported hail the size of a grapefruit.