New study reveals regional differences in nightmares

Travel, toes and tornadoes… how the images that visit us during nightmares vary by country

  • The analysis of Google search reports in nightmares varies greatly by region.
  • In the UK, bees often appear in bad dreams. In the USA, ophthalmologists dream
  • Australians dream of natural disaster and killer animals or insects
  • New study by bed company reveals regional differences in sleep

Some nightmares may seem very ordinary: being chased by an enemy, missing a train, or taking an exam without any preparation.

But night terrors differ not only from person to person, but also from country to country.

Analysis Google the search data has shed light on the world’s most unique nightmares, which range from tornadoes, loss of a limb, to going to work.

Experts say that in the UK, bees are often a sign of more unique bad dreams that can indicate social anxiety or feelings of out of place.

The unique nightmare searches in the US have included visiting an eye doctor, dropping off toes, and even playing the tuba, which experts say may signal a fear of unwanted attention.

An analysis of Google search data has shed light on the world’s most unique nightmares, which range from tornadoes, losing a limb to going to work.

The unique nightmare searches in the US have included visiting an eye doctor, dropping off toes, and even playing the tuba, which experts say may signal a fear of unwanted attention.

The unique nightmare searches in the US have included visiting an eye doctor, dropping off toes, and even playing the tuba, which experts say may signal a fear of unwanted attention.

Meanwhile in Australia, night terrors reflect nature, with bugs, snakes and weather appearing in many Google searches. And in Germany, adults have travel nightmares, which could signal anxiety about the direction they are heading in life.

The French have nightmares about FaceTime, Italians have bad dreams about food, and in Vietnam, many worry about their ex-lovers.

Rex Isap of Happy Beds, who commissioned the study, said: “It’s important to remember that most dreams are just the brain’s processing of the feelings of your waking life, and this is nothing to worry about.”