The huge $60 million project is using a one-mile underground detector in South Dakota to search for dark matter.

The huge $60 million project is using a specialized detector one mile below the surface in South Dakota to find dark matter, which makes up 85% of the universe but has yet to be seen.

  • A giant dark matter project is working on an abandoned gold mine
  • The area located in South Dakota is one mile below the surface.
  • Scientists built a dark matter detector in the open area of ​​the mine
  • It has two large reservoirs that activate light and electrons when dark matter is detected.

The $60 million dark matter detection project is being conducted one mile underground.

Dark matter makes up 85 percent of all matter in the universe, but its existence has yet to be proven.

A team of 250 scientists work in an abandoned North Dakota gold mine where they built a massive dark matter detector called LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) – and the machine recently delivered its first data.

Frank Wolfs, a professor of physics and astronomy at Rochester who oversees Rochester’s efforts on the project, said in an interview. statement: “We haven’t seen any dark matter, but the first results from LZ show that it is currently the most sensitive dark matter detector in the world.

“LZ will collect data for approximately 1,000 days, which will significantly increase the sensitivity of dark matter detection that was achieved during the first data collection period.”

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A team of 250 scientists are working at an abandoned gold mine in South Dakota, where they built a massive dark matter detector called LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) – and the machine recently delivered its first data.

The team has been working underground for only two months – the experiment is designed for five years.

And although the first data points were empty, they hope that LZ will capture signs of elusive particles before the mission is completed.

The team believes that the detector will return 20 times more data during the experiment, and the probability of detecting dark matter with LZ is “probably less than 50 percent, but more than 10 percent,” said Hugh Lippincott, physicist and spokesman for LZ. experiment at a press conference on Thursday, as reported by CBS News.

The idea of ​​dark matter, originally known as “missing matter”, was formulated in 1933 after it was discovered that the mass of all the stars in the Volosia galaxy cluster used up about one percent of the mass needed to keep galaxies from leaving the planet. gravitational attraction of the cluster.

The team has been working underground for only two months - the experiment is designed for five years.  And although the first data points were empty, they hope that LZ will capture signs of elusive particles before the mission is completed.

The team has been working underground for only two months – the experiment is designed for five years. And although the first data points were empty, they hope that LZ will capture signs of elusive particles before the mission is completed.

The South Dakota team is just one of many who hope to be the first to prove the existence of dark matter.  The team descends to the mine in 10 minutes in protective gear.

The South Dakota team is just one of many who hope to be the first to prove the existence of dark matter. The team descends to the mine in 10 minutes in protective gear.

Decades later, in the 1970s, American astronomers Vera Rubin and Kent Ford discovered anomalies in the orbits of stars in galaxies.

This discovery gave rise to the theory in the scientific community that the anomalies were caused by masses of invisible “dark matter” located in and around galaxies.

But since then it has remained just a theory.

The South Dakota team is just one of many who hope to be the first to prove the existence of dark matter.

The team descends to the mine in 10 minutes in protective gear.

“All of our electronics have been designed specifically for the LZ with the goal of maximizing our sensitivity to the smallest possible signals,” Wolfs said.

LZ is specifically designed to search for a type of theoretical particle called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, and the key to this is the two reservoirs connected to the detector.

The tanks are filled with 22,046 pounds of highly purified liquid xenon, which is a colorless, odorless, dense noble gas found in trace amounts in the Earth’s atmosphere.

The properties of xenon atoms allow them to emit light under certain particle interactions.

If or when a theoretical particle is detected, sequences of light and electrical signals will be triggered inside the tank.

Dark Matter: The mysterious stuff that makes up 85% of the universe that scientists can’t confirm

Dark matter is a hypothetical substance that is said to make up roughly 85 percent of the universe.

The mysterious material is invisible because it does not reflect light, and scientists have never directly observed it.

Astronomers know it exists because of its gravitational effect on known matter.

The European Space Agency says: “Shine a torch into a completely dark room and you will only see what the torch illuminates.”

Dark matter is a hypothetical substance that is said to make up roughly 27 percent of the universe.  This is believed to be the gravitational

Dark matter is a hypothetical substance that is said to make up roughly 27 percent of the universe. This is believed to be the gravitational “glue” that holds the galaxies together (artist’s impression).

“That doesn’t mean the room around you doesn’t exist.

“Similarly, we know that dark matter exists, but have never directly observed it.”

This material is thought to be the gravitational “glue” that holds galaxies together.

Calculations show that many galaxies would be torn apart rather than spinning if they weren’t held together by large amounts of dark matter.

Only five percent of the observable universe is made up of known matter, such as atoms and subatomic particles.