NASA’s James Webb Telescope aims at the Carina Nebula, Stefan’s Quintet, the South Rim Nebula, and other objects.

DISCOVERED: A complete set of NASA images from the James Webb Telescope will show detailed views of a stellar nursery of stars larger than the Sun and a cluster of galaxies 290 million light-years away.

  • NASA’s James Webb Telescope will show new views of stellar nurseries, groups of galaxies and a huge planet outside our solar system.
  • The space agency lists five targets for the first set of full-color science images to be released Tuesday, July 12 at 10:30 am EST.
  • “I’m just as excited as anyone else who is waiting for the first beautiful full-color images and data to be released,” said a longtime Webb scientist.
  • The release of the first images is just the beginning of Webb’s scientific endeavor to “open up the universe.”

NASA showed that the James Webb telescope will be aimed at several impressive space objects, including distant stellar nurseries, a giant planet beyond our planet. solar system and a group of galaxies that is 290 million light-years away – before the publication of its first images.

The space agency lists five main targets for the first set of full-color science images from the $10 billion telescope, which will be released Tuesday, July 12 at 10:30 am EST.

“Even after years of working on the program, I am just as excited as anyone else who is looking forward to the release of the first beautiful full-color images and data from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, an audacious effort in collaboration with the European and Canadian Space Agencies,” says Eric Smith. Webb Program Scientist at NASA who has served on the telescope team since its inception in the mid-1990s.

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“The James Webb Space Telescope will give us a fresh and powerful look at our universe,” said Webb program scientist Eric Smith. Pictured is the Carina Nebula as seen from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

“The James Webb Space Telescope will give us a fresh and powerful look at our universe,” he adds in a statement.

The targets were chosen by a panel of representatives from NASA, the European Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

The Carina Nebula is one of the brightest and largest nebulae in space, located about 7,600 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina.

Nebulae are stellar nurseries where stars are born, and it is this nebula that is home to many giant stars, including some larger than the sun.

The South Rim Nebula, pictured above, is nicknamed

The South Rim Nebula, pictured above, is nicknamed “The Figure Eight” because it looks like a figure-eight when viewed through some telescopes.

The South Rim Nebula, also known as the Eight Bang Nebula, is a planetary nebula that is an exploding cloud of gas surrounded by a dying star.

According to NASA, its diameter is almost half a light year, and the distance to Earth is about 2,000 light years.

WASP-96 b, pictured above, is a gas giant exoplanet that orbits a G-type star.  This planet is located 1150 light years from Earth and orbits its star every 3.4 days.

WASP-96 b, pictured above, is a gas giant exoplanet that orbits a G-type star. This planet is located 1150 light years from Earth and orbits its star every 3.4 days.

Next on the list is WASP-96 b, a giant planet outside our solar system made up mostly of gas.

This planet is located 1150 light years from Earth and orbits its star every 3.4 days.

WASP-96 b has about half the mass of Jupiter and was discovered in 2014.

The Stephan's Quintet group pictured above is part of the James Webb telescope's list of targets for the first images to be released next week.

The Stephan’s Quintet group pictured above is part of the James Webb telescope’s list of targets for the first images to be released next week.

Stephen’s Quintet is located in the constellation Pegasus and is known as the first compact group of galaxies, discovered in 1787.

NASA notes that four of the five galaxies in the quintet are locked in a cosmic dance of repeated close encounters.

Regarding the end goal of SMACS 0723, NASA says:

“Massive clusters of galaxies in the foreground magnify and distort the light of objects behind them, allowing for a deep field of view of both extremely distant and inherently faint populations of galaxies.”

“What questions might Webb’s observations now raise that would turn our curiosity to unimaginable things?” Smith asks.

“We will soon begin to understand how Webb will change our understanding of the universe.”

JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE

The James Webb Telescope has been called a “time machine” that can help unravel the mysteries of our universe.

The telescope will be used to look back at the first galaxies born in the early universe more than 13.5 billion years ago and observe the sources of stars, exoplanets and even our solar system’s moons and planets.

Already worth over $7 billion (£5 billion), the huge telescope is said to be the successor to the Hubble Orbiting Space Telescope.

The James Webb telescope and most of his instruments have an operating temperature of approximately 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

This is the world’s largest and most powerful orbiting space telescope, capable of looking 100-200 million years ago after the Big Bang.