The Apple Car project ran into trouble, including a test car that nearly collided with a jogger

The road ahead looks bumpy for an Apple Car.

A new report shows that the effort, dubbed Project Titan and dating back to 2014, is suffering from a “revolving door of leaders”, time wasted on slick demos, and a lack of commitment to mass production from CEO Tim Cook.

According to a report from Information This is based on conversations with 20 employees of the company. Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, is “particularly skeptical” of the project and has voiced his concerns to other Apple executives.

Cook, who “rarely visits” the project’s Santa Clara offices, California – also “did not want to engage in mass vehicle design,” the report said, which disappointed other firm executives.

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Apple Car is suffering from management changes, ever-changing goals and a lack of full commitment from the company’s top management, according to The Information. The photo shows a prototype car based on real Apple patents.

Apple CEO Tim Cook, pictured above, reportedly rarely visited the project's office.

Apple's senior vice president of software development Craig Federighi (pictured above) is reportedly skeptical of the project.

Apple’s Car effort, dubbed Project Titan, has run into a number of challenges, according to a new report from The Information based on interviews with 20 employees.

Project Titan was led at various times by Ian Goodfellow, Bob Mansfield, Doug Field and Kevin Lynch.

Earlier this year, one of Apple’s test vehicles nearly collided with a jogger while traveling at about 15 miles per hour.

The Information reports that the car’s software first identified the runner as a “stationary object”, then reclassified it as a “stationary person” and then finally as a “moving pedestrian”.

However, even with this change, the car “only adjusted its path a little.”

Earlier this year, one of Apple's test vehicles nearly collided with a jogger while traveling at about 15 miles per hour.  Pictured above is a prototype Apple Car.

Earlier this year, one of Apple’s test vehicles nearly collided with a jogger while traveling at about 15 miles per hour. Pictured above is a prototype Apple Car.

Luckily, the backup driver “slammed on the brakes at the last moment”, bringing the car to a halt “within a few feet” of the runner.

If the human had not intervened, Apple’s tests showed that the car “would almost certainly have run over the runner.”

Following the incident, Apple reportedly temporarily stopped its fleet of test vehicles to investigate what happened and added the crosswalk to its map database.

The car's current look includes

The car’s current look includes “four inward-facing seats so passengers can talk to each other and a curved ceiling similar to that of a Volkswagen Beetle,” the report said. Pictured above is a prototype car interior based on Apple patents.

Problems are reported at the time the survey is conducted in Consumer Reports shows that 28 percent of Americans “wouldn’t consider” buying an electric car “at all” – whether it’s from Apple, Tesla, or one of the big automakers.

Consumer Reports says the most common concerns cited in this segment were charging, driving range and cost.

Former Apple design chief Jony Ive, who played a vital role in the development of most of the company’s most popular products, is reportedly consulting with the tech giant and told the Apple Car team to “consider the oddities” of its design rather than try to hide sensors.”

The car’s current look includes “four inward-facing seats so passengers can talk to each other and a curved ceiling that looks like the roof of a Volkswagen Beetle,” according to The Information.

Apple Car designers are apparently experimenting with a trunk that automatically raises and lowers to give owners “easier access to storage space.”

They also looked at a design that would allow passengers to “lie down and sleep in the car,” according to the tech news website.

The Apple Car team created some slick demo videos for Cook and other senior executives, including a drone-captured 40-mile crossing of Montana to show the progress of the project.

However, this example also showed how engineers “waste precious time staging demonstrations” on known routes, proving that the technology works in certain places, but almost nowhere else.

“If you spend enough money, you can get to work by almost any fixed route,” former Uber self-driving car engineer Arun Venkatadri told The Information. “But what’s not shown is whether you can build scalable self-driving software and whether you can operate over a wide enough area.”

The Cupertino, California-based company is reportedly still targeting 2025 for the potential launch of its self-driving car.

APPLE DEVELOPING ITS OWN AUTOMATIC CAR?

CEO Tim Cook has suggested that Apple wants to go beyond integrating Apple smartphones into car infotainment systems.

CEO Tim Cook has suggested that Apple wants to go beyond integrating Apple smartphones into car infotainment systems.

Apple officially received permission to test autonomous vehicles in California on April 14, 2018.

Rumors have been floating around the net since last year that Apple has been mulling over the idea of ​​developing its own self-driving car.

But Apple executives have been reserved about expressing their interest in these vehicles.

CEO Tim Cook has suggested that Apple wants to go beyond integrating Apple smartphones into car infotainment systems.

He called autonomous vehicles the “mother of all” AI projects.

Apple’s Project Titan secret fleet of self-driving cars almost doubled in the first few months of 2018.

It has expanded its self-driving vehicle test fleet from 27 to over 50 vehicles and is testing some in California.

There was no public announcement about whether the company would build its own cars, but Cook said in 2017 that Apple would focus on software for existing cars.

One of Apple’s self-driving test vehicles, called “The Thing,” has six LIDAR – light and range detection sensors – placed on top to help the car “see” its surroundings.

A wider rollout has yet to be announced.

Apple has partnered with Volkswagen to develop self-driving vans to transport Apple employees around campus.

In self-driving cars, LIDAR sensors constantly scan surrounding areas for information and act as the

One of Apple's test vehicles, called

In self-driving cars, LIDAR sensors constantly scan surrounding areas for information and act as the “eyes” of the car.