James Webb astronomer says telescope will reveal key secret of universe

James Webb will “revolutionize our understanding of the universe” and reveal key mysteries – how black holes and galaxies are formed – as a stunning image shows how a black hole “feeds” on gas from other galaxies.

  • NASA’s huge $10 billion telescope will answer several persistent questions about our universe as it looks back in time more than 13 billion years.
  • “James Webb will revolutionize our understanding of the universe,” Anton Koukemor, James Webb’s astronomer, told DailyMail.com.
  • “Webb will reveal one of the keys to this mystery of how galaxies and black holes coalesce, one of the key mysteries of cosmology.”

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As NASA The James Webb telescope released its first magnificent images of the deepest corners of the universe, astronomer-researcher Anton Kukemur could not help but be very pleased.

Kokemur is on the team at the $10 billion Near Infrared Space Telescope (NIRcam) and has pre-processed raw data that was culled from hundreds of original exposures taken to create the stunning images released by NASA on Tuesday around the world.

“It’s one thing to expect what Webb will produce – we knew it would be a spectacular tool – and quite another thing to see them right in front of you,” Kukemur tells DailyMail.com by phone.

“It’s truly breathtaking how much James Webb will change our understanding of the universe,” he adds, noting that an important mystery about black holes could be solved thanks to the telescope’s high-tech prowess.

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“We looked at this with a near-infrared camera and in more detail with one of the other instruments, which is a kind of spectroscopy or computed tomography of a tiny area,” says astronomer Anton Koukemor. Pictured is the Stefan Quartet

“It's amazing how much James Webb will change our understanding of the universe,” explains Anton Kukemur to DailyMail.com.  Pictured above is the Stefan Quartet.

“It’s amazing how much James Webb will change our understanding of the universe,” explains Anton Kukemur to DailyMail.com. Pictured above is the Stefan Quartet.

In the Stefan Quintet image, we see streams of stars breaking away from galaxies as they interact.

Most galaxies have a supermassive black hole at their center — ours is called Sagittarius A, and has a mass 4 million times that of our Sun — but the galaxies in Stefan’s quintet gravitationally interact with each other and therefore interfere with each other.

This disturbance causes gas and dust to fall into the center of these galaxies.

Black holes grow by feeding on the gas that enters them, and this gas heats up to about a million degrees.

Black holes grow by feeding on the gas that enters them, and this gas heats up to about a million degrees.

“For one of them, the gas and dust reached the black hole at the center and actually turned it on — the black hole with the hot gas around it heats up as [the gas] spiraling towards the black hole,” Kuquemor explains, referring to the much brighter point of light in the upper right of the Stefan Quintet image.

Black holes can grow by feeding on the gas that enters them, and this gas heats up to about a million degrees.

After the gas is heated, it forms a stream of other gases, which can be precisely increased thanks to the power of James Webb’s instruments: the “atomic lines” of a gas composed of argon, iron, neon, sulfur and oxygen are shown. .

“We looked at this with a near-infrared camera and in more detail with one of the other instruments, which is a kind of spectroscopy or CT scan of a tiny area,” he says, adding that scientists can “slice into that area.” up.

“We looked at this with a near-infrared camera and in more detail with one of the other instruments, which is a kind of spectroscopy or computed tomography of a tiny area,” says the astronomer.

“We looked at this with a near-infrared camera and in more detail with one of the other instruments, which is a kind of spectroscopy or computed tomography of a tiny area,” says the astronomer.

When scientists measure the mass of galaxies, and do the same for the mass of the black holes they surround, the mass of the galaxies almost always matches the mass of the black holes in a one-to-one line.

However, it has never been clear to scientists why this should be so.

“It takes 100,000 light-years for a galaxy to travel through it,” Kukemur says.

“A black hole, it only takes light a day or two to get through.

“It’s still a big black hole, but it’s millions of times smaller than the size of the galaxy it’s in.

“Why should a more massive galaxy have a more massive black hole?

“When you’re trying to understand the physics of how it works, it’s quite difficult to create models or simulations of black holes and galaxies that grow in the same way.

“Webb will reveal one of the keys to this mystery of how galaxies and black holes coalesce, one of the key mysteries of cosmology.”

JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE

The James Webb Telescope is called a “time machine” that can help unravel the mysteries of our universe.

The telescope will be used to look back at the first galaxies born in the early universe more than 13.5 billion years ago and observe the sources of stars, exoplanets and even our solar system’s moons and planets.

Already worth over $7 billion (£5 billion), the huge telescope is said to be the successor to the Hubble Orbiting Space Telescope.

The James Webb telescope and most of his instruments have an operating temperature of approximately 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

This is the world’s largest and most powerful orbiting space telescope, capable of looking 100-200 million years ago after the Big Bang.

The Orbital Infrared Observatory is designed to be about 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA prefers to think of James Webb as Hubble’s successor rather than his replacement, as the two will work in tandem for a while.

The Hubble Telescope was launched on April 24, 1990 by the Space Shuttle Discovery from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It orbits the Earth at about 17,000 miles per hour (27,300 km per hour) in low Earth orbit at an altitude of about 340 miles.