James Webb Telescope: NASA Reveals the Deepest Photo of the Early Universe

The James Webb Telescope has captured the deepest and most detailed images of the universe to date, revealing galaxies billions of light-years away.

An incredible image taken by the recently launched James Webb Space Telescope takes us back to where the universe began. This is the most detailed image of our universe to date.

The stunning deep image of galaxies was unveiled at a White House briefing by US President Joe Biden showing “the deepest and clearest infrared image of the early universe” ever taken.

Photons traveling to the telescope 13 billion years are like a time machine and show what the universe was like 13 billion years ago.

The image, released on Monday at 5:30 pm (US time), shows thousands of galaxies and the faintest objects ever observed, colored in infrared and blue, orange and white tones.

Also, this is only part of the observable universe, and it focuses on the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, and the photo was taken over a period of 12.5 hours.

The image is somewhat similar to the groundbreaking Hubble Space Telescope observations, the Hubble Deep Field and Hubble Ultra-Deep Field images.

“Mr. President, if you hold a grain of sand on the tip of your finger at arm’s length, this is the part of the universe that you see – just one small point of the universe,” said NASA head Bill Nelson.

“What you see are galaxies, galaxies shining around other galaxies whose lights have been curved, and you only see a small part of the universe.”

The telescope is the world’s newest and most powerful deep space telescope, and it has allowed us to look closer to the dawn of time than ever before.

US Vice President and National Space Council Chair Kamala Harris called the JWST “one of mankind’s greatest engineering achievements.”

“Today’s images are testament to the amazing work done by thousands of workers across the country who have dedicated years to this project,” she said.

“Revolution” in astronomy

Mr. Nelson also promised at the briefing that this image would be just the first of many, with subsequent images looking further and deeper into space.

“The light you see in one of these little dots has been traveling for over 13 billion years,” he said.

“And we’re going back even further – this is just the first image… we know the universe is 13.8 billion years old, we’re going back almost to the beginning.”

Mr. Nelson said that the telescope would not only help to look into the earliest moments of the universe, but the accuracy and clarity of the telescope would help explore habitable planets.

“It will be so accurate that you will see if the planets are habitable due to the chemical composition.”

Ms Harris said the telescope and its images represent “a new chapter in the exploration of our universe.”

“Since the beginning of history, people have looked at the night sky in wonder,” she said.

“And thanks to dedicated people who have worked for decades in the field of engineering and scientific marvels, we can look at the sky with a new understanding.

The JWS telescope was launched last December as the successor to the famous Hubble telescope.

The $13 billion project is a collaboration between NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency and will enable further research in astronomy and cosmology.

Ms Harris said the telescope and its images represent “a new chapter in the exploration of our universe.”

“Since the beginning of history, people have looked at the night sky in wonder,” she said.

“And thanks to dedicated people who have worked for decades in the field of engineering and scientific marvels, we can look at the sky with a new understanding.

“Building on the legacy of Hubble, the James Webb Space Telescope allows us to look deeper into space than ever before, and with stunning clarity.

“This will allow us to expand our knowledge of the origins of our universe, our solar system, and possibly life itself.”

The Hubble Telescope is famous for creating the iconic composite image of the Carina Nebula’s stellar nursery, famous for its towering pillars, including Mystery Mountain, a three-light-year-tall cosmic peak.

Earth’s past and future

However, this is not just a look into the past, which scientists around the world are waiting for.

Mr. Biden said the “historic” project also had a direct bearing on shaping our understanding of the future of the Earth as a planet.

“It’s like you’re in a very dark room and you only have a little hole that you can look through,” he said of the previous technology.

But now, with the JWS telescope, “you’ve opened a huge window, you can see all the little details.”

Mr. Biden said the significance of the JWS telescope is proof of the importance of space exploration in understanding the Earth’s own future.

“It shows what we can achieve, what else we can learn not only about distant places, but also about our own planet and climate,” he said.

“That’s why the American government needs to invest in science and technology – even more than we’ve done in the past.”

Mr. Biden also said the project is a testament to the strength of US allies.

“Six and a half months ago, a rocket was launched carrying the world’s newest and most powerful deep space telescope on a journey a million miles deep into space,” he added.

“And as a partnership with others, it symbolizes the relentless spirit of American ingenuity.”

The full set of images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope will be released on July 12 and will include unprecedented views of distant galaxies, bright nebulae and a distant giant gas planet.

The international committee decided that the first wave of full-color science images would also include the Carina Nebula, a huge cloud of dust and gas 7,600 light-years away, and the South Rim Nebula, which surrounds a dying star 2,000 light-years away.

Originally published as NASA’s James Webb Telescope captures the deepest image of the early universe