Discovered the origin of the meteorite “Black Beauty”

Scientists have revealed more about the origin of the famous Black Beauty meteorite, also known as NWA 7034.

The researchers used artificial intelligence to analyze thousands of high-resolution planetary images of the Martian surface taken from a number of missions to Mars.

They found that Black Beauty was ejected into space when an asteroid hit the planet’s surface and formed the six-mile-wide crater Karratha 5-10 million years ago.

Black Beauty, which weighs just 11 ounces (320 grams), led to the creation of a new class of meteorite when it was discovered in 2011 in the Western Sahara Desert.

North West Africa (NWA) 7034, nicknamed the Black Beauty, led to the creation of a new class of meteorites when it was discovered in 2011 in the Sahara desert.

The meteorite was ejected from the Martian crater Karrat 5-10 million years ago as a result of an asteroid impact.

The meteorite was ejected from the Martian crater Karrat 5-10 million years ago as a result of an asteroid impact.

HISTORY OF BLACK BEAUTY

Five to ten million years ago, an asteroid crashed into Mars. He created a massive crater and ejected a piece of ancient Martian crust into space as a new meteorite that eventually crashed into Africa.

Researchers now know where this meteorite came from on Mars – from the Karrat crater in the planet’s southern hemisphere.

Black Beauty is formed by Martian rocks that formed almost 4.5 billion years ago, when the crust of the Earth and Mars was still young.

Now that we know the source of Black Beauty, researchers can use it to compare the formation of Mars and Earth.

Black Beauty is not the oldest Martian meteorite in existence – the name belongs to NWA 7533, which is 4.4 million years old.

To date, more than 300 Martian meteorites have been discovered on Earth.

Black Beauty is the only brecciated Martian rock available on Earth, which means it contains angular fragments of several rock types cemented together.

The researchers explain that this distinguishes it from all other Martian meteorites containing separate rock types.

It is also known to contain the most water of all Martian meteorites found on Earth.

“For the first time, we know the geological context of the only Martian breccia sample available on Earth, 10 years before NASA Sample Return Mission from Mars is going to send back samples collected by the Perseverance rover, which is currently exploring Jezero Crater,” said study author Dr. Anthony Lagain of Curtin University in Perth, Australia.

For a study published in Connection with naturethe team used a new machine learning algorithm called the Crater Detection Algorithm.

They analyzed a very large volume of high-resolution planetary images using a machine learning algorithm to detect impact craters.”

Using the size and spatial distribution of more than 90 million impact craters detected by the Crater Detection Algorithm, they determined the most likely location for an ejecta from Mars.

The authors found that the oldest fragments of NWA 7034 were excavated approximately 1.5 billion years ago in an impact that created the 25-mile-wide Khudjirt crater.

Hujirt is located in the northeast of a large Martian region called Terra Cimmeria Sirena, in the southern hemisphere of Mars.

The material ejected from this impact was then ejected from Mars by a second impact that created the smaller Karratha crater, six miles wide, 5–10 million years ago.

Researchers now know where this meteorite came from on Mars - from the Karrat crater in the southern hemisphere of the red planet.  Karratha crater is pictured here in the center, in Dampier crater.

Researchers now know where this meteorite came from on Mars – from the Karrat crater in the southern hemisphere of the red planet. Karratha crater is pictured here in the center, in Dampier crater.

This image shows the distribution of 90 million craters on the surface of Mars, obtained using the crater detection algorithm.  The red circle marks the crater Karratha, where the meteorite probably came from.

This image shows the distribution of 90 million craters on the surface of Mars, obtained using the crater detection algorithm. The red circle marks the crater Karratha, where the meteorite probably came from.

Therefore, it is believed that the stones ejected during the first collision simply remained on the surface of Mars until the second impact more than a billion years later.

The study could help locate the ejection site of other Martian meteorites to provide the most complete picture of the Red Planet’s geological history.

“We’re also adapting the algorithm that was used to pinpoint the Black Beauty’s ejection point from Mars to unlock other secrets of the Moon and Mercury,” said co-author Professor Gretchen Benedix of Curtin University.

“This will help unravel their geological history and answer burning questions that will help future exploration of the solar system, such as the Artemis program to send people to the Moon by the end of the decade, or the BepiColombo mission to orbit around Mercury in 2025. .’

The oldest fragments of NWA 7034 were excavated approximately 1.5 billion years ago in an impact that created the 25-mile-wide Khujirt crater.  The material ejected from this impact was subsequently ejected from Mars by a second impact that formed the smaller Karrat crater 5–10 million years ago.

The oldest fragments of NWA 7034 were excavated approximately 1.5 billion years ago in an impact that created the 25-mile-wide Khujirt crater. The material ejected from this impact was subsequently ejected from Mars by a second impact that formed the smaller Karrat crater 5–10 million years ago.

If water appeared on Mars earlier than previously thought, this suggests that water may be a natural by-product of some process early in the planet's formation.

If water appeared on Mars earlier than previously thought, this suggests that water may be a natural by-product of some process early in the planet’s formation.

In 2013 NWA 7034 was 2.1 billion years old – the second oldest Martian meteorite after NWA 7533.

Scientists said that at the time, the cricket ball-sized meteorite contained more water than any other Martian meteorite found on Earth.

Part of NWA 7034 was donated to the University of New Mexico by an American who bought it from a Moroccan meteorite dealer.

Many of the Martian meteorites that exist today were found in the Sahara by Bedouin tribes who know that these stones can fetch a good price in the Casablanca market.

Explanation: difference between asteroid, meteorite and other space rocks

An asteroid is a large piece of rock left over from collisions or the early solar system. Most of them are located between Mars and Jupiter in the Main Belt.

BUT comet rock covered with ice, methane and other compounds. Their orbits take them much farther from the solar system.

BUT meteor this is what astronomers call a flash of light in the atmosphere as debris burns up.

This rubbish is known as meteoroid. Most of them are so small that they evaporate in the atmosphere.

If any of these meteoroids reach the Earth, it is called meteorite.

Meteors, meteoroids and meteorites are usually formed from asteroids and comets.

For example, if the Earth passes through the tail of a comet, most of the debris burns up in the atmosphere, forming a meteor shower.