Spain to introduce free multi-stop train travel from September

(CNN) – Public transport prices for public services across Spain have already been halved in response to rapidly rising energy levels and inflation. Now the government has announced additional 100% discounts.

From September, passengers will be able to travel free of charge on various trains of the Renfe network.

Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez announced that from 1 September until the end of 2018, tickets for trains operated by the public services of the Cercanías, Rodalies and Media Distance networks (equivalent to local and medium journeys) will be free. year.

According to public broadcaster TVE, the measure does not apply to one-way tickets or long-distance travel. Multi-trip tickets include a minimum of 10 round trips.

Saving money and the environment

“This measure encourages the maximum use of this form of collective public transport in order to guarantee the necessary daily commute with a safe, reliable, convenient, economical and sustainable means of transport in the face of extraordinary circumstances of steadily rising energy and fuel prices. “, the Spanish Ministry of Transport said in a statement.

The Renfe scheme was announced shortly after the Spanish government pledged to cut public transport fees by 50% for public transport.

Spain is not the only European country to take measures to cut public transport costs.

Last month, Germany launched at €9 ($9.50). an unlimited monthly public transport ticket that can be used on local and regional transport throughout the country. The deal, which is part of the government’s energy assistance package, runs until the end of August.
At the end of 2021, Austria introduced “climate ticket” with a significant discount operates on all types of public transport in the country, with the aim of encouraging people to leave their cars at home.

Klimaticket only costs $1,267 (€1,095) per year, which works out to about $3.50 per day.

Featured Image Credit: Maria José López / Europa Press / AP

Tamara Hardingham-Gill and Ben Jones also contributed to this report.