Areas across England to be hardest hit by heatwaves in coming years

Scientists have identified areas across England that will be hit by extreme heat waves in the coming years as they warn that heatwaves will become more intense due to changing of the climate.

The top five local governments are the areas most at risk BirminghamNottingham, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Hackney, according to new research.

Leicester, Coventry, Bristol and Southampton, as well as Peterborough, Reading and Luton are also in the top 30.

An analysis by researchers from the University of Manchester found which areas (areas with an average population of 1,700) are most at risk from heat now and in future warming scenarios.

Concerns: Scientists have identified areas across England that will be hit by extreme heat waves in the coming years as they warn that heatwaves will become more intense due to climate change. The top five local authorities with the most “dangerous” areas are Birmingham and Nottingham, and 30 of those listed are shown on this map.

An analysis by researchers from the University of Manchester found which areas are most at risk from heat now and in future warming scenarios.

An analysis by researchers from the University of Manchester found which areas are most at risk from heat now and in future warming scenarios.

AREAS IN ENGLAND, THE MOST DANGEROUS HEAT WAVES
Local government Number of districts at risk of heat waves in the region
Birmingham 210
Newham 154
Tower Hamlets 117
Hackney 111
nottingham 101
Southwark 91
Leicester 85
Enfield 81
Ealing 79
haringi 79
Waltham Forest 75
Lambeth 72
Brent 71
Coventry 69
Bristol 68
peterborough 61
Croydon 60
Barking and Dagenham 59
Lewis 57
Islington 47
Southampton 46
Luton 45
Greenwich 44
West Northamptonshire 44
Hounslow 41
Wandsworth 38
Westminster 34
Slough 32
Reading 29
Camden 28

In all scenarios, communities with a below-average carbon footprint, i.e. those who are less responsible for the climate crisis, will be most affected by global warming.

The study also found that people of color are four times more likely to live in areas with a high risk of dangerous heat levels.

The communities most vulnerable to the health hazards of high temperatures are those with large numbers of older people and children, those with no green space to shelter from the heat, and those where housing types such as multi-storey buildings and mobile houses are most prone to overheating.

Hot weather can put particular stress on the heart and lungs, meaning most serious illnesses and deaths caused by heat are related to respiratory and cardiovascular disease, according to the Met Office.

Elderly people, people with pre-existing medical conditions, and young children are at particular risk.

The study also suggests that even if the world continues on track to meet the global goal of limiting warming to 2.7°F (1.5°C), more than 3,000 of the most vulnerable areas – more than six million people – will be regularly impacted” . very hot weather 81.5 °F (27.5 °C) for five or more days during the summer months.

If the temperature rises to 5.4°F (3°C), then the same areas will be regularly exposed to dangerously high temperatures in excess of 86°F (30°C).

The analysis was conducted for the environmental campaign group Friends of the Earth, which calls for prioritizing the 3,000 most vulnerable areas for publicly funded adaptation projects and for stepping up efforts to reduce planet-warming greenhouse gases.

Mike Childs, head of research at Friends of the Earth, said: “The extreme heatwaves and health warnings we’re seeing this week will become much more frequent and severe due to climate change.”

“To prevent the most dangerous scenarios from becoming a reality, all countries, including the UK, must do more to prevent rampant climate deterioration.”

He added: “Suggestions by some politicians that the UK should drop its climate targets are short-sighted and reckless.

This graph shows the number of areas at high risk of extreme heat based on three different warming scenarios: 2.7°F (1.5°C), 3.6°F (2°C), and 5.4°F (3° C).

This graph shows the number of areas at high risk of extreme heat based on three different warming scenarios: 2.7°F (1.5°C), 3.6°F (2°C), and 5.4°F (3° C).

This graph shows the percentage of areas that could experience hot weather, very hot weather, or dangerously hot weather each year under three different warming scenarios.

This graph shows the percentage of areas that could experience hot weather, very hot weather, or dangerously hot weather each year under three different warming scenarios.

In all scenarios, communities with below-average carbon footprints will be the most affected by global warming.

In all scenarios, communities with below-average carbon footprints will be the most affected by global warming.

“People at the forefront of the climate crisis in the UK and abroad are already suffering the consequences, despite being the least responsible.

“We need governments to redouble their efforts to reduce emissions and fund climate change adaptation programs like planting street trees.”

The study also found that nearly half (48 per cent) of areas – or 28 million people – in England would experience “very hot weather” at 2.7°F (1.5°C) warming.

This will rise significantly if global temperatures rise by 3.6°F (2°C) and 5.4°F (3°C), affecting 60 percent (34 million people) and 81 percent (46 million people) of areas respectively .

A global temperature increase of 5.4°F (3°C) will put 50 percent of areas – or 30 million people – at risk of “dangerous hot weather” when temperatures reach 86°F (30°C) or more for five or more days summer.

Global temperatures are already 1.98°F (1.1°C) above pre-industrial levels.

Under the Paris Agreement, governments agreed to limit warming to 2.7 °F (1.5 °C) to avoid catastrophic climate change.

According to estimates based on current climate commitments, the world is moving towards 4.32°F (2.4°C) warming, but those commitments are not being met.

The UK government’s advisory body, the Committee on Climate Change, believes that only 39 percent of the policies in its net zero strategy are credible.

PARIS AGREEMENT: GLOBAL AGREEMENT TO LIMIT TEMPERATURE RISES THROUGH CARBON REDUCTION TARGETS

The Paris Agreement, first signed in 2015, is an international agreement to control and limit climate change.

He hopes to keep the rise in global mean temperature below 2°C (3.6°F) “and continue efforts to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C (2.7°F)”.

It looks like the more ambitious goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C (2.7°F) may be more important than ever, according to a previous study that claims 25 percent of the world could face a significant increase in dry conditions.

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main goals for reducing emissions:

1) The long-term goal is to keep global mean temperature increases well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels.

2) Strive to limit the rise to 1.5°C as this will significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.

3) Governments have agreed on the need to peak global emissions as soon as possible, recognizing that it will take longer for developing countries.

4) After that, take quick cuts according to the best available science.

Source: European Commission.