Patient support as NHS greenlights two new breast cancer drugs

Patient support as NHS greenlights two new breast cancer drugs

  • Life-extending drug Alpelisib targets gene that causes fast-growing tumors
  • Clinical trials show that the drug can extend a person’s life by about five months.
  • Trodelvy can treat a type of cancer that can’t be removed with surgery
  • Health Minister Steve Barclay called him a “pioneer of innovation”.

Thousands of breast cancer patients to receive two new drugs NHS.

About 3,000 women a year will benefit from the life-extending drug alpelisib. And 650 patients with a specific type of breast cancer will have access to Trodelvy. It finally got the green light for NHS use, despite being tentatively rejected earlier this year.

Alpelisib, manufactured by Novartis, is used to target a gene that causes fast-growing tumors. John Stewart, NHS commissioning director, said it would help people with secondary breast cancer live longer.

Approximately 3,000 women a year will receive the life-extending drug Alpelisib, and 650 patients with certain types of breast cancer will have access to Trodelvy Pictured: mammography consultant

He said: “This 100th life-extending breast cancer treatment is the 100th delivered quickly to NHS patients thanks to the Anti-Cancer Drug Fund and will help people with secondary breast cancer live longer.”

Meanwhile, Trodelvy, also called Sacituzumab Govitecan and manufactured by Gilead Sciences, has also been approved to treat a type of cancer that cannot be removed with surgery.

The drug may help women with triple-negative untreatable secondary breast cancer who are currently being offered chemotherapy.

Triple negative breast cancer is more common in women younger than 40 and affects 15 to 20 percent of all women with the condition.

The National Institute for Health and Excellence (Nice) said that the goal of the new treatment is to target a protein on the surface of tumor cells, which ultimately leads to their death.

Clinical trials show that the drug can slow the progression of the disease by several months and prolong a person’s life by about five months compared to traditional chemotherapy.

Triple negative breast cancer affects 15 to 20 percent of all women with the condition Stock Photo: 3D digital illustration of cancer cells in the human body

Triple negative breast cancer affects 15 to 20 percent of all women with the condition Stock Photo: 3D digital illustration of cancer cells in the human body

Nice said the drug could be considered as a treatment option after women have already received “two or more systemic treatments.”

Baroness Delit Morgan, Executive Director of Breast Cancer Now, which campaigns to make Trodelvy available, said: “The news that Trodelvy has finally been recommended by Nice for use on the NHS in England marks an important and long-awaited milestone. for some women living with incurable triple negative secondary breast cancer.

“After a devastating pre-failure in April, this landmark decision will offer new, effective treatment for these women and, very importantly, give them hope for priceless additional months to live and do what matters most to them and their loved ones.”

Health and Human Services Minister Steve Barclay said: “We are constantly monitoring the most promising treatments. The incredible work of the Cancer Drug Foundation since 2016 has provided early access to 100 cancer treatments for more than 80,000 patients and is a pioneer of innovation.”