Ashes of 8,000 victims of Soldau concentration camp in Poland found in mass graves

A pair of mass graves containing 19 tons of ashes from at least 8,000 people have been discovered outside the former Nazi concentration camp Soldau in Poland.

The estimate is based on the weight of the remains: four pounds is roughly equivalent to one body.

The researchers said that at some point the victims were killed and buried, but then Nazi Party members dug them up and burned them in an attempt to cover up the murders.

In place of the dug graves, there is now a stone monument with the inscription “Nieznani meczennicy Polegli za polskosc”. 1939-1944 ‘in Polish and reads’ Unknown martyrs fell for Polishness. 1939-1944 ‘in English.

Officials unveiled the monument on Wednesday, noting that war crimes committed on the ground will not be forgotten.

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Now the grave is covered with a stone monument with the inscription “Nieznani meczennicy Polegli za polskosc”. 1939-1944 ‘read in Polish’ Unknown martyrs fell for Polishness. 1939-1944′

This was stated by the President of the Institute of National Remembrance in Poland (IPN) Karol Nawrocki. statement: “The Germans decided to evade responsibility for their crimes.”

He went on to explain that about 8,000 victims were probably taken outside the camp and executed by a shot to the head in 1939.

The mass grave was unearthed last month, but an official commemoration ceremony took place on Wednesday outside the ruined Soldau concentration camp.

One of the discovered graves is 91 feet long and the other is 39 feet long.

A pair of mass graves containing 19 tons of ashes from at least 8,000 people have been discovered outside the former Nazi concentration camp Soldau in Poland.  The photo shows what is left of the camp.

A pair of mass graves containing 19 tons of ashes from at least 8,000 people have been discovered outside the former Nazi concentration camp Soldau in Poland. The photo shows what is left of the camp.

Officials unveiled the monument on Wednesday, noting that war crimes committed on the ground will not be forgotten.

Officials unveiled the monument on Wednesday, noting that war crimes committed on the ground will not be forgotten.

Tomasz Jankowski of IPN said during the conference: “People whose ashes are buried here have been killed and robbed.”

The bodies were then thrown into a large grave, but when Soviet troops entered Poland, Nazi soldiers frantically dug up the victims, burned them, and dumped the ashes in one grave, believed to have happened in 1944.

“The cover-up failed because IPN is determined to look for the victims and heroes of World War II and will never let any of them be forgotten,” Navrotsky said.

The Soldau camp was established in the autumn of 1939 and initially served as a POW camp for Poland's Jewish elite.  Pictured is the camp when it was working

The Soldau camp was established in the autumn of 1939 and initially served as a POW camp for Poland’s Jewish elite. Pictured is the camp when it was working

The IPN is an institution that investigates crimes committed during the Nazi occupation of Poland and during the communist era.

The Soldau camp was established in the autumn of 1939 and initially served as a POW camp for Poland’s Jewish elite.

It was located in Dzialdowo, a city in northeastern Poland.

This program entailed experiments in gassing people with mental disabilities.

In May 1940, the SS camp was converted into a labor educational camp, which was used by all state police posts in East Prussia until January 1945, when it was captured by Soviet soldiers.

The photo shows the place where the mass graves were discovered.

The photo shows the place where the mass graves were discovered.

Construction work continues at the former German Nazi concentration camp Soldau in Dzialdowo, Poland, on July 13, 2022, near the site where the mass graves were discovered.

Construction work continues at the former German Nazi concentration camp Soldau in Dzialdowo, Poland, on July 13, 2022, near the site where the mass graves were discovered.

In the spring of 1944, Nazi soldiers were ordered to carry out an exhumation operation called “Action 1005” near Soldau to erase the traces of the 1940 and 1941 massacres.

“In the spring of 1944, the remains of people were excavated at this place and burned so that this crime would not see the light of the day and no one would be held accountable,” IPN shared on Twitter.

In the wooded area around the former camp, there are several monuments that were erected in honor of the 13,000 to 20,000 victims of the concentration camp.

Andrzej Ossowski, a genetics researcher at the Pomeranian Medical University, told AFP that ash samples from the mass grave have been taken and will be studied in a lab.

“We can do DNA testing that will allow us to learn more about the identity of the victims,” he added after similar studies in the former Nazi camps at Sobibor and Treblinka.