Get an inside look at how the impressive first images of the James Webb Space Telescope were taken.

NASA Magnificent first images from the James Webb Space Telescope offer a detailed view of ancient and distant galaxies exoplanets – are the result of the collaboration of astronomers and visual designers to obtain the best possible images of the universe.

Astronomer Anton Koukemor, who worked with the James Webb Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam), played a key role in converting the huge amount of data collected by Webb’s detectors into something useful.

“I used specialized computer scripts to process and combine 900 image files into six full-sized mosaics for six different wavelengths in NIRCam, with which we observed this,” says Kukemer, who has worked with the Hubble Space Telescope for many years. Dailymail.com.

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Astronomer Anton Kuquemur, who worked with James Webb’s near-infrared camera, and Joseph Depasquale, a senior developer of scientific imaging, played a key role in Webb’s imaging. Pictured: the South Rim Nebula, about 2,500 light years away.

“From time to time I stepped back and realized that this is the future of astronomy – it’s just incredible,” says Joseph Depasquale, senior scientific imaging designer.  Pictured: The

“From time to time I stepped back and realized that this is the future of astronomy – it’s just incredible,” says Joseph Depasquale, senior scientific imaging designer. Pictured: The “space rocks” of the Carina Nebula are visible in the image, divided horizontally by a wavy line between the cloudscape forming the nebula along the bottom and the relatively clear top.

Each tiled image is 12,654 by 12,132 pixels, or over 150 million pixels in total.

Kuquemore then passed the baton to his colleagues at the Space Telescope Institute, including Senior Imaging Scientist Joseph Depasquale, who was tasked with creating the final full-color images, which were released with much fanfare on July 12.

“When I started processing data and making color images, I was keen to really get into the details, right down to the pixels, when I work,” said Depasquale, who worked as a science operator at NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. explains DailyMail.com over the phone.

“From time to time I stepped back and realized that this is the future of astronomy – it’s just incredible.”

“The first image data we received from Webb was just an incredible experience to look at this image data, even in black and white,” he says.  Pictured is a never-before-seen detail of the Stefan Quartet, a visual group of five galaxies.

“The first image data we received from Webb was just an incredible experience to look at this image data, even in black and white,” he says. Pictured is a never-before-seen detail of the Stefan Quartet, a visual group of five galaxies.

“Deep field is my favorite image — the impact of this image is so monumental to me,” Depasquale says, referring to the image above, which was released by President Biden Monday night.

“Deep field is my favorite image — the impact of this image is so monumental to me,” Depasquale says, referring to the image above, which was released by President Biden Monday night.

Depasquale stressed that his team “worked very closely” with the scientists working on each of Webb’s powerful detectors.

“The first image data we received from Webb was just an incredible experience to look at this image data, even in black and white,” he says.

“The amount of detail and the level of clarity.”

“This is really important for creating the initial black and white image for our work,” he explains. “We worked closely with scientists to make sure the data was as clean as possible when it reached us.”

Depasquale and his colleague Alyssa Pagan took data sets and tested whether they were pure enough to be processed and used in a program that applied color based on the wavelength of light.

Pagan and Depasquale worked on a fairly tight schedule – they had about six weeks to put everything together – and the budget was about 2-3 days of processing each image between them.

They also used what they’d learned earlier while working with Webb’s simulation data to understand instrumental artifacts that can affect an image — things like horizontal streaks when dark lines appear in an image, for example.

“Deep field is my favorite image. The impact of this image on me is so great,” says Depasquale, referring to the stunning photo of the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 taken by general by President Biden on Monday evening.

“I was completely amazed and flattered that the work I had worked so hard for was explained to the nation by the President of the United States that it was unrealistic,” he adds.

The image shows thousands of galaxies, including some of the faintest objects ever seen in infrared.

NASA has said it is a piece of the vast universe, covering an area of ​​the sky about the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on earth.

Compared to Hubble, which took weeks to collect light from the farthest corners of the universe, James Webb got a sharper image of weaker light after just 12 or so hours of exposure.

“This is a quantum leap in our understanding of the universe,” says Depasquale. “We’re just getting started.”

“In almost every aspect [the James Webb] exceeds expectations – now it’s up to the astronomers.”

“In almost every aspect [the James Webb] exceeds expectations – now it’s up to the astronomers,” says Depasquale. In the image, an artist’s rendering provided by Northrop Grumman via NASA shows the James Webb Space Telescope.

US President Joe Biden watches a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) briefing on the first images from the Webb Space Telescope.

US President Joe Biden watches a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) briefing on the first images from the Webb Space Telescope.

JAMES WEBB TELESCOPE

The James Webb Telescope is called a “time machine” that can help unravel the mysteries of our universe.

The telescope will be used to look back at the first galaxies born in the early universe over 13.5 billion years ago and observe the sources of stars, exoplanets and even our solar system’s moons and planets.

Already worth over $7 billion (£5 billion), the huge telescope is said to be the successor to the Hubble Orbiting Space Telescope.

The James Webb telescope and most of his instruments have an operating temperature of approximately 40 Kelvin – about minus 387 Fahrenheit (minus 233 Celsius).

This is the world’s largest and most powerful orbiting space telescope, capable of looking 100-200 million years ago after the Big Bang.

The Orbital Infrared Observatory is designed to be about 100 times more powerful than its predecessor, the Hubble Space Telescope.

NASA prefers to think of James Webb as Hubble’s successor rather than his replacement, as the two will work in tandem for a while.

The Hubble Telescope was launched on April 24, 1990 by the Space Shuttle Discovery from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It orbits the Earth at about 17,000 miles per hour (27,300 km per hour) in low Earth orbit at an altitude of about 340 miles.