“Moose Graveyard” with 15 mutilated heads found at the foot of a steep slope in Idaho.

‘Moose graveyard’ with 15 mangled heads and countless broken bones found at the foot of a steep slope in Idaho: wildlife officials say animals died in avalanche

  • Idaho fishing and hunting officials picked up a signal about the death of a collared moose.
  • The employees followed the signal and stumbled upon a moose cemetery at the foot of a steep slope.
  • The team speculates that the moose was climbing the mountain when the avalanche released large boulders that sent the moose down about 1,000 feet.

Idaho Fishing and hunting officials recently stumbled upon a “moose graveyard” at the foot of Mount Craig in Idaho.

The gruesome sight included 15 moose heads, patches of fur, torn flesh, mutilated antlers, and countless broken bones.

Wildlife personnel were led to a gruesome scene when a radio-collared moose on Mount Craig sounded its death signal.

Arriving at the slope, the team determined that it was a landslide with boulders the size of a beach ball, which killed the herd as it attempted to climb over the mountain.

Pictured are some of the giant boulders that fell during the avalanche.

The gruesome sight included 15 moose heads, patches of fur, torn flesh, mutilated antlers, and countless broken bones.

Idaho Fish and Game came across a pile of bones, fur and flesh on July 8 after receiving signals from one of their moose.

Mark Shepard, Senior Technician at Idaho Fish and Game, wrote in Press release: “Data obtained from GPS collars gives wildlife personnel the ability to track where collared individuals are, their movements, and possibly where and, in some cases, how they die.

“When an animal is suspected to have died, Idaho Department of Fish and Game officials go to the last location and collect data to determine the cause of death.”

Officials went to Craig Mountain to find what they thought was a lone dead moose, but instead they stumbled upon a total of 15 dead animals.

Idaho state fishing and hunting officials recently stumbled upon a

Wildlife personnel were led to a gruesome scene when a radio-collared moose on Mount Craig sounded the death signal.

Wildlife personnel were led to a gruesome scene when a radio-collared moose on Mount Craig sounded the death signal.

They speculate that the herd was climbing the mountainside when the avalanche dropped giant boulders.

The avalanche tossed “them nearly 1,000 feet down at only 300 to 400 yards, this group of moose were trapped in the rubble and snow, eventually leading to death,” Shepard wrote.

The team sifted through the bones and found a total of four radio collars.

In a video posted by Idaho Fish and Game, Shepard can be heard saying, “I’m sure [there was] a little bit of garbage collection,” Shepard says in the video. “But with so many bones, it’s hard to tell which ones go with which collar.”

They speculate that the herd was climbing the mountainside when the avalanche dropped giant boulders.

They speculate that the herd was climbing the mountainside when the avalanche dropped giant boulders.

The avalanche brought

The avalanche brought “them down almost 1,000 feet at only 300-400 yards, this group of moose got stuck in the rubble and snow, eventually leading to death.”

Mount Craig is located near where Washington and Oregon meets Idaho and is a 115,000-acre wildlife conservation area.

The recent moose deaths are similar to another heard in Oregon in 2018. Northwest Athlete reports.

A total of 19 people were crossing Central Cascades Mountain when a large stone slab collapsed from the mountain and buried them.

Officials speculate that the event occurred either in 2016 or 2017, but was not discovered until the summer of 2018.

“Natural events such as avalanches and rockfalls often go unnoticed, and it is generally not known how these events affect wildlife,” Shepard writes.

“This event is evidence that natural events such as this can affect wildlife populations.

“Collared on multiple species across the state for months and years, allows the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to make management decisions to conserve, protect, and preserve wildlife for the continued use and enjoyment of the public.”