Sir Patrick Vallance is warning MPs that we will be plunged into a crisis due to the effects of climate change.

Sir Patrick Vallance warned that the world was about to face “50 years of really big climate-related problems” at a briefing for MPs.

The chief scientific adviser suggested that the disturbances would be worse than those experienced during COVID-19 a pandemic that lasted two and a half years.

Monday’s briefing was intended to brief 70 MPs on the current state of the climate to help develop policy.

He said: “To give you three observable facts… the world is warmer than it was, CO2 levels in the atmosphere are higher than ever, and extreme weather events are more frequent than before all this happened.

“This is what we are facing and the purpose of this briefing… is to talk about science.”

Sir Vallance (pictured) gave a somber introduction before the expert presentations by Prof. Stephen Belcher and Prof. Gideon Henderson.

At the 55-minute Zoom briefing, each expert presented slides on emissions, climate science and the tangible impacts of climate change that we will see in the UK following an introduction by Chief Scientist Sir Patrick Vallance (bottom left).

At the 55-minute Zoom briefing, each expert presented slides on emissions, climate science and the tangible impacts of climate change that we will see in the UK following an introduction by Chief Scientist Sir Patrick Vallance (bottom left).

The briefing presented the latest developments in climate science, including the rise in CO2 concentrations and average global temperatures over the past decades.

The briefing presented the latest developments in climate science, including the rise in CO2 concentrations and average global temperatures over the past decades.

WHAT WAS THE CLIMATE BRIEFING FOR?

The climate briefing, held via Zoom on Monday afternoon, was intended to inform MPs about the climate crisis and encourage more urgent action.

It included an updated version of the slides that Sith Chief Science Adviser Patrick Vallance showed Boris Johnson before the November Cop26 climate summit.

the latest climate science, including rising CO2 concentration and global average temperatures over recent decades.

Experts also talked about the impact of the climate emergency on health, the environment and other factors.

The briefing was organized by the All Party Parliamentary Caucus on Climate Change and Peers for the Planet.

However, no MP running for the next leader of the Conservative Party attended.

His dark introduction came before presentations by Prof Stephen Belcher of the Met Office and Prof Emily Shackburg of Cambridge Zero.

Professor Gideon Henderson, Chief Scientific Adviser, Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, also made a presentation.

Within 55 minutes Enlarge briefingeach expert presented slides on emissions, climate science and the tangible effects of climate change that we will see in the UK.

The panel of experts did not make any policy recommendations, but Vallance stressed that policies “must be determined by governments and must be implemented.”

He said: “We have had two and a half years of global crisis in the form of a pandemic.

“We’ve been facing really big climate-related challenges for 50 years now, and the nature of this threat to countries around the world means it should be on the agenda of absolutely every government.

“You can’t pretend it’s not happening.

“This will be something that governments around the world should focus on.”

The adviser added: “Science has played an important role in discovering the problem, in describing and monitoring the problem, and is essential to the solution.

“Whether it’s about mitigation or…adaptation, because whatever we do, the changes that have happened are fed into the system.

“They won’t disappear, they will increase over time, and so we need to be able to adapt to a changing environment.”

Belcher’s data from the Met Office showed that significant changes have taken place in the world’s oceans, ice and biosphere since human evolution.

He said Arctic sea ice has decreased by an average of 12 percent over the past four decades and we could lose more territory than India, Bangladesh and Bhutan combined in the next four decades.

Data from Professor Stephen Belcher of the Met Office showed that the rate of increase in global temperature in his presentation at the Climate Briefing

Data from Professor Stephen Belcher of the Met Office showed that the rate of increase in global temperature in his presentation at the Climate Briefing

As evidence, the head of science and technology at the Met Office cited recent extreme weather events such as flood in Europe as well as Bangladeshand North American heat wave.

Climatologist Emily Schuckburg was more optimistic as she showed that it was possible to cut emissions while increasing the county’s gross domestic product.

She stressed that the pace of emission reductions is still too slow to meet our zero targets and reductions should be seen in more sectors such as ground transportation and buildings.

Defra professor Gideon Henderson said extreme heatwaves like the one the UK is experiencing todaycan interfere with food production.

As they become more frequent, we may see more cases of potato rot and heat stress in livestock, which will reduce farmers’ yields.

Climatologist Emily Schuckburg was more optimistic in her slides as she showed it was possible to cut emissions while increasing the county's gross domestic product.

Climatologist Emily Schuckburg was more optimistic in her slides as she showed it was possible to cut emissions while increasing the county’s gross domestic product.

Shackburg emphasized that the rate of emission reductions still needs to increase, and in more sectors such as land transport and construction, if we are to reach net zero.

Shackburg emphasized that the rate of emission reductions still needs to increase, and in more sectors such as land transport and construction, if we are to reach net zero.

He also drew attention to the challenges facing the UK’s coastal defenses due to sea level rise.

In his opening remarks, Vallance stressed to parliamentarians that new technologies will not cut emissions enough to stop the effects of climate change, and we also need to consider significant lifestyle changes.

He said: “Technology will be an important part of solving this problem, but it’s not a magic solution and it won’t do it on its own.”

“If you take 2050, any technology that you don’t see already working will not save us.

Defra Professor Gideon Henderson said extreme heat waves like the one the UK is experiencing today could hamper food production.  As they become more frequent, we may see more cases of potato rot and heat stress in livestock.

Defra Professor Gideon Henderson said extreme heat waves like the one the UK is experiencing today could hamper food production. As they become more frequent, we may see more cases of potato rot and heat stress in livestock.

Henderson drew attention to the problems our coastal defenses would face with rising sea levels.

Henderson drew attention to the challenges our coastal defenses would face with rising sea levels.

“This will absolutely not get us out of this because of the scale in which these things need to be implemented.

“We need to keep innovating, keep discovering and keep innovating, but we also need to be very active right now to innovate what we have.

“We have to recognize that technology alone will not help us get out of this situation. This is a system-wide problem that affects almost every part of every department.

“You have to think of it as a systems approach, it can’t be an approach where you pick and choose and hope you find a solution.”

SEA LEVEL MAY RISE 4 FEET BY 2300

Scientists have warned that global sea levels could rise by 1.2 meters (4 feet) by 2300 even if we reach the Paris 2015 climate targets.

Long-term changes will be caused by ice melt from Greenland to Antarctica, which should change global coastlines.

Rising sea levels threaten cities from Shanghai to London, low-lying areas of Florida or Bangladesh, and entire countries like the Maldives.

It is imperative that we curb emissions as soon as possible to avoid even more growth, says a new report from a German-led research team.

Sea levels will rise by 0.7 to 1.2 meters by 23:00, according to the report, even if almost 200 countries fully meet the targets of the 2015 Paris Agreement.

The targets set by the agreements include reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero in the second half of this century.

Ocean levels will rise inexorably as industrial heat-trapping gases already released will linger in the atmosphere, melting more ice, the report said.

In addition, water naturally expands when heated above four degrees Celsius (39.2 °F).

Every five years of delays in peak global emissions beyond 2020 would mean an additional 20 centimeters (8 inches) of sea level rise by 2300.

“Sea level is often presented as a very slow process that you can’t do much about… but the next 30 years really do matter,” said study lead author Dr Matthias Mengel of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Potsdam, Germany. .

None of the nearly 200 governments that signed the Paris Accords are on track to fulfill their obligations.