Lab-grown pork sausages are made from a single pig cage and really sizzle.

Many Britons take advantage of the sunny weather to enjoy their barbecues and their fridges are full of hamburgers, buns and, of course, sausages.

To help us enjoy our food completely guilt-free, an innovative food company today unveiled its new lab-grown sausage that sizzles just like the real thing.

Meatable grows cultured meat from just one animal cell, replicating natural muscle and fat growth.

Sausage is the first product announced by the company Dutch a company whose goal is to create real meat without harm to the environment or animals.

Daan Luyning, co-founder and CTO of Meatable, said: “This is not just meat, this meat is 100% delicious meat, identical on every level, but without any flaws.

“This is one step towards creating new natural meats and I look forward to seeing how the product develops before we can bring it to consumers in the next few years.”

Meatable grows cultured meat from just one animal cell, replicating natural muscle and fat growth. Sausage is the first product announced by a Dutch company whose goal is to create real meat without harm to the environment or animals.

Daan Luyning, co-founder and CTO of Meatable, said:

Daan Luyning, co-founder and CTO of Meatable, said: “This is not just meat, this meat is 100 percent tasty meat, identical on every level, but without any flaws.”

HOW ARE SAUSAGES MADE?

Pluripotent pig cells have been isolated. They can increase in huge numbers and turn into muscle and fat.

2. The cells are shaken in the conical flask – this allows them to stick together and grow.

3. Transfer to a bioreactor. Cells are in ideal conditions for growth and are fed with proteins, sugar and salt.

4. Harvest. Once they have grown enough, the cells are removed and turned into sausages.

Meatable has been developing and improving its cultured meat growing process since its launch in 2018.

The products use “opti-ox” technology, which requires only a single animal cell sample, which can be taken without harm to it.

This process does not require fetal bovine serum (FBS), which is commonly used in cultured meat production as an additive to cell feed.

FBS is a controversial ingredient as it is harvested from bovine fetuses taken from pregnant cows at the time of slaughter.

It is usually taken from a cardiac puncture without any form of anesthesia, exposing the fetus to pain and discomfort.

The Meatable team claims that their sausage, which takes only a few weeks to grow, has the same structure, texture, gloss and pronounced pork flavor as sausage made from minced pork shoulder.

It even sizzles in the pan, which is the result of the evaporation of moisture from fatty tissue in hot oil.

Crane de Nood, co-founder and CEO of Meatable, said: “This is truly an exciting moment for the entire Meatable team.

“Seeing and making our sausages for the first time was an incredible experience, especially since my co-founder Daan and I finally got to try them for the first time.

“It was especially exciting as we know that all of our hard work over the past four years has come to fruition in creating a real meat sausage, indistinguishable from traditional pork sausage.”

It is currently illegal to sell cultured meat in Europe without regulatory approval, but the Meatable team hopes to have their product on store shelves by 2025.

They have been working with regulators in the Netherlands to support the adoption of a proposal that could allow wider tasting of cultured meat by the end of the year.

In the future, they will continue to refine their range with nutrition scientists and chefs until it is as indistinguishable from traditional meat as possible.

Daan Luyning said: “I hope more people can try it soon after the Dutch government’s proposal to allow controlled tastings.”

Crane de Nood added: “We believe cultured meat is the future of food, meat that will satisfy the appetites of the world without harming the planet or animals.”

“We can’t wait to enable more people to try beef meat as the next step in our journey to create new natural meat.”

The sausage making process also doesn't require the dubious fetal bovine serum that was used in cultured meat production as a cellular nutritional supplement.

The sausage making process also doesn’t require the dubious fetal bovine serum that was used in cultured meat production as a cellular nutritional supplement.

The Meatable team claims that their sausage has the same structure, texture, gloss, and pronounced pork flavor as a sausage made with minced pork shoulder.  It even sizzles in the pan as the moisture in the fatty tissue evaporates in the hot oil.

The Meatable team claims that their sausage has the same structure, texture, gloss, and pronounced pork flavor as a sausage made with minced pork shoulder. It even sizzles in the pan as the moisture in the fatty tissue evaporates in the hot oil.

Research from an environmental consultant CE Delft states that cultured meat can reduce the environmental impact of the meat industry by 92 percent.

O 14 percent global emissions in the world are caused by the meat industry, but eating animal products harms the environment different ways.

Cows, pigs and other farm animals emit huge amounts of methane into the atmosphere.

Although there is less methane in the atmosphere than other greenhouse gases, it is about 25 times more efficient at trapping heat than carbon dioxide.

Raising livestock also means converting forests into farmland, that is, cutting down trees that absorb CO2, further exacerbating climate change.

More trees are being cut down to convert land for crops, as about a third of all grain produced in the world is used to feed animals raised for human consumption.

Overall, research has shown that going vegetarian can cut carbon emissions from food by half, and going vegan can cut it even more.

scientists say The overall environmental impact of cultured meat production is likely to be significantly lower than that of traditional meat production.

However, a direct comparison is not yet possible because cultivated products are not produced on an industrial scale.

It is currently illegal to sell cultured meat in Europe without regulatory approval, but the Meatable team hopes to have their product on the shelves by 2025.  They are working with the Dutch regulators to support the adoption of a proposal that could allow wider tasting of cultured meat by the end of the year.

It is currently illegal to sell cultured meat in Europe without regulatory approval, but the Meatable team hopes to have their product on the shelves by 2025. They are working with the Dutch regulators to support the adoption of a proposal that could allow wider tasting of cultured meat by the end of the year.

You must be kidding me! Scientists reveal plans to make plant-based cheese from yellow peas

From bug bolognese to vegetable salmonScientists around the world have been hard at work creating vegan Alternatives to our favorite products.

And they’re not slowing down as researchers are well on their way to developing a brand new vegan cheese made from yellow peas.

A study from the University of Copenhagen describes the “functional basis” of vegetable cheese made from pea protein.

This means they have created a fermented yellow pea base that can serve as a starting point for cheese and contains 10 percent protein.

Further work needs to be done to fine-tune the flavor and texture until they are indistinguishable from milk-based cheese.

Read more here

Milk-based cheese has been refined and revised since the time of the ancient Egyptians, giving it a distinctive flavor that is difficult to replicate (file image)

University of Copenhagen study describes the

University of Copenhagen study describes the “functional basis” of a plant-based cheese made from pea protein, extra virgin olive oil, sucrose and glucose (file image)