Future warming threatens marine life in more than 70 percent of the most biodiverse regions of the oceans.

New research shows that future rates of warming threaten marine life in more than 70 percent of the most biodiverse parts of the Earth’s oceans.

The researchers used the new technique to compare past and future ocean warming temperature extremes, allowing them to map the global impact on the future. changing of the climate and determine the distances that species will need to move to find the best climatic conditions.

“Our study shows that areas with exceptionally high marine biodiversity are most exposed to future ocean warming, making them especially vulnerable to climate change in the 21st century,” said lead author Dr. Stuart Brown from the University of AdelaideInstitute of the Environment in statement.

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New research shows that some of Earth’s most biodiverse ocean regions are under threat from climate change. Pictured: A caretta caretta is seen while diving near the Liman area in the Kas district of Antalya, Turkey on September 21, 2021.

“Our study shows that places with exceptionally high marine biodiversity are most affected by future ocean warming,” said the study’s lead author. Pictured: A group of gray reef sharks (Carcharhinus ammblyrhynchos) and blacktip reef sharks (Carcharhinus melanopterus) swimming near Tahiti, French Polynesia, in the Pacific Ocean.

“This is because species living in these biodiverse regions tend to be poorly adapted to responding to large changes in temperature.”

Some of the most vulnerable areas contain most of the reef-forming corals, while other vulnerable regions are home to marine megafauna, including manatees.

“In many cases, this will require moving long distances beyond the oceanic regions to which these species have evolved and to which they are adapted, at a speed of movement rarely seen in marine life,” Brown explained.

“While we have known for several years that recent anthropogenic climate change is affecting marine life through shifts in the distribution and abundance of species, the spatial pattern of the impact of past and future rapid ocean warming remains unclear,” the University said in a statement. Adelaide Associate Professor Damien Fordham, also from the Environment Institute.

'In many cases [the warming] long-distance movements will be required outside the oceanic regions in which these species have evolved and to which they are adapted, at a speed of movement rarely seen in marine life,” Brown explained.  The southern stingray, Dasyatis americana, is pictured above resting in groups on a sea mountain off the coast of Isla Mujeres, Mexico, Caribbean Sea.

‘In many cases [the warming] long-distance movements will be required outside the oceanic regions in which these species have evolved and to which they are adapted, at a speed of movement rarely seen in marine life,” Brown explained. The southern stingray, Dasyatis americana, is pictured above resting in groups on a sea mountain off the coast of Isla Mujeres, Mexico, Caribbean Sea.

“Showing that areas of high marine biodiversity are disproportionately affected by future warming, our results provide important new information for designing and strengthening conservation efforts to protect marine biodiversity in the face of climate change,” Fordham explained.

“Showing that areas of high marine biodiversity are disproportionately affected by future warming, our results provide important new information for designing and strengthening conservation efforts to protect marine biodiversity in the face of climate change,” Fordham explained.

“Conserving these richest areas of marine biodiversity will require many species to move far beyond the biogeographic realm where they are endemic, at a rate of redistribution never seen before,” the researchers said in the study abstract.

“Showing that areas with high levels of marine biodiversity are disproportionately affected by future warming, our results provide important new information for designing and strengthening action to conserve marine biodiversity in the face of climate change,” Fordham explained.

“Actions that strengthen ecological and evolutionary resilience to climate change should be a priority. These could include improving fisheries management, facilitating species movement, and expanding well-managed, climate-smart marine protected areas.”

The scientists’ study was published this month in the journal Biology of global change.

Separate study published in the journal One Earthfound that more than a quarter of the Earth’s oceans need protection so that marine species can live without human impact.

The researchers in this study said that millions of square miles of ocean should be banned from all human activities such as fishing, commercial shipping and limiting pesticide runoff into the waters.

“This science shows that governments must act boldly, as they did under the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, if we are to stop the extinction crisis that many marine species are facing,” said James Watson, scientific director of the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Virtually every component of the Earth's climate system underwent large-scale changes from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum to the beginning of the Holocene (about 19,000 to 11,000 years ago, according to researchers).

Virtually every component of the Earth’s climate system underwent large-scale changes from the end of the Last Glacial Maximum to the beginning of the Holocene (about 19,000 to 11,000 years ago, according to researchers).

WHAT IS BIODIVERSITY?

Biodiversity is the variety of life on Earth.

It covers diversity, the number of plant and animal species, the genetic diversity within and between those species, and the different biomes and ecosystems of which they are part.

These ecosystems may include rainforest, tundra, and desert.

Biodiversity also includes a variety of microscopic organisms, including bacteria, viruses and fungi.

How does biodiversity affect us?

Biodiversity provides us with food directly or through pollination, medical discoveries and ecosystem services.

The latter include everything from purifying water and absorbing the chemicals that wetlands do to providing us with oxygen to breathe.

Threats to biodiversity

The Earth’s biodiversity is declining due to actions such as deforestation, land use change, agricultural intensification, overconsumption of natural resources, pollution and climate change.

Some scientists believe that there is enough evidence to confirm that we are in the sixth mass extinction of the Earth.

It is here that the widespread loss of 75% of species occurs in a relatively short geological period of two million years.

There have been five mass extinctions so far, perhaps the most famous of which is the death of dinosaurs caused by an asteroid.

But the current mass extinction is different because it is caused by humans.