Tesla Says 35 MILLION Autonomous Miles Have Been Driven Since Launching Full Self Driving Beta in 2020

TeslaThe full self-driving beta has covered 35 million miles, collecting a mammoth amount of data that will further improve its capabilities, with most of those miles completed in the last seven months.

“Now we have rolled out our beta version of FSD with city driving capability to over 100,000 owners – they are very happy with the capabilities of the system and we will continue to improve it every week,” CEO. Elon Musk Tesla said on this week’s earnings call.

“We’ve now covered over 35 million miles with the FSD Beta.”

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During this week’s second-quarter earnings call, Tesla said the full self-driving beta has driven a total of 35 million miles since its launch, with most of that in the past seven months.

Tesla plans to continue expanding the FSD beta to more owners in the coming months.  Pictured above, an employee drives a Tesla Model S hands-free on a highway in Amsterdam.

Tesla plans to continue expanding the FSD beta to more owners in the coming months. Pictured above, an employee drives a Tesla Model S hands-free on a highway in Amsterdam.

“That’s more offline miles than any company we know of, I think probably more than any other company combined. So, this mileage is growing exponentially.”

Waymo by Alphabet, on the other hand, disclosed in August 2021, its autonomous vehicles have traveled 20 million miles since 2009, a 12-year time period.

The electric vehicle maker also shared data showing that from October 2020, when the first FSD beta tests were launched, to November 2021, the cumulative mileage was less than 5 million miles.

Just like the more people use Google search, the better it works, as more and more drivers use FSD beta, the software will improve exponentially.

“And we’re expecting — sorry, our Giga Texas (pictured above) to break the 1,000 car week mark, hopefully in the next few months,” Musk said during an earnings call.

Tesla’s Canadian Drivers Blog predicts the company could hit 100 million miles by the end of this year.

The tech mogul also responded to concerns about the FSD beta that were raised when Andrei Caparti announced he left the company last week.

“Well, since Andrei himself wrote all the code, naturally, things came to a standstill,” Musk joked.

“But we have a team of about 120 people in our AI software group who are extremely talented. And I think that we will have — I’m very confident that we will solve the problem of full self-driving, and it looks like it will happen as early as this year.

“It looks like we are getting closer to solving the problem of full self-driving this year.”

During the earnings call, Musk shared an update on the company’s production targets, which have been called into question due to Covid-related supply chain chaos.

“We reduced the number of body welding robots by 70 percent per unit capacity in Austin and Berlin,” Musk explained.  Pictured above is Gigafactory Texas.

“We reduced the number of body welding robots by 70 percent per unit capacity in Austin and Berlin,” Musk explained. Pictured above is Gigafactory Texas.

“In June, we reached the milestone of 1,000 vehicles a week,” he said, referring to the firm’s plant in Berlin, Germany.

“And we expect… sorry, our Giga Texas will break the 1,000 car week mark, hopefully in the next few months.”

Tesla, which manufactures most of the parts for its cars in-house, is also looking at ramping up its manufacturing process.

“We’ve made a lot of progress in manufacturing processes,” Musk said during a profit and loss call. “As we now show in the shareholder deck, with our large castings, we make the largest castings in the world.

“We have reduced the number of body welding robots by 70 percent per unit of capacity in Austin and Berlin.

“This is, so to speak, a car repair shop, which is about 3 times smaller than usual.

“And I have to say that it’s also lighter, cheaper and has superior noise and vibration harshness. So it’s good on every level.

But this journey is not over. We will bring the Cybertruck to a new level of simplicity and manufacturing improvements, as well as future products that we are not quite ready to talk about right now, but I think it will be very interesting to present them in the future.”

WHAT IS THE TESLA GIGAFACTORY?

Tesla’s last gigafactory in the US is located in Austin, Texas, near the Colorado River.

The name of the factory comes from “giga” – a unit of measure denoting billions.

One gigawatt hour is equivalent to generating one billion watts in one hour—a million times more than one kilowatt hour.

The plant covers 2,500 acres with over 10 million square feet and will be the manufacturing hub for the Model Y and the future home of the Cybertruck.

This is equivalent to world production in 2014.

New York consumes about 52 gigawatt-hours of energy per year.

Tesla also operates very large factories in Nevada, New York, Berlin and Shanghai.