99% PAPER Ecotest Pregnancy Promises to Reduce Plastic Waste from Used Tests

A positive result for the planet? The 99% PAPER Ecotest Pregnancy promises to reduce plastic waste with 12.5 million tests conducted in the UK each year.

  • 99% paper pregnancy test could help reduce plastic in landfill
  • After use, Hoopy tests can be cut in half, and one part can be sent for recycling.
  • The founder was inspired by how many tests she passed while trying to conceive.
  • Another percentage of the test is a thin strip of plastic that protects the result.

A pregnancy test made from 99 percent paper promises to help reduce the amount of plastic waste thrown away by 12.5 million people in the UK each year.

The Hoopsy test is designed to be cut in half after using it: the part that the user throws in the bin and the rest can be sent to paper recycling.

The carton can also be sent to paper recycling, and the bag containing the test strip can be recycled as soft plastic at the supermarket.

The one percent of the test that was not counted is a thin plastic layer over which the result is displayed to protect it.

Founder Lara Solomon was inspired to create the product after she started trying to conceive, and it dawned on her how many trials she had to go through.

She said: “Life can be difficult, especially when you’re trying to get pregnant month after month.

“But our planet shouldn’t suffer because so many plastic tests end up in landfills.”

The Hoopsy carton can also be sent to paper recycling, and the bag containing the test strip can be recycled as soft plastic at the supermarket.

The Hoopsy test is designed to be cut in half after using it: the part that the user throws in the bin and the rest can be sent to paper recycling.

The Hoopsy test is designed to be cut in half after using it: the part that the user throws in the bin and the rest can be sent to paper recycling.

HOW MUCH PLASTIC WASTE DOES GO TO LANDSCAPE?

Recent poll from Greenpeace found that the British recycle almost 100 billion pieces of plastic packaging a year.

It also found that only 12% of single-use packaging used by households is recycled.

The rest is exported to other countries (17%), buried in landfills (2%) or burned in waste incinerators (45%).

“My goal with Hoopsy is to provide sustainable healthcare products that help women, their partners and the planet,” she added.

“Knowing that every test we sell means one less plastic test tossed in the bin makes me jump out of bed every morning.”

An estimated five million tons of plastic are thrown away in the UK each year, nearly half of which is in packaging.

Most pregnancy tests are mostly made of hard plastic, the main function of which is to hold the absorbent paper strip in a stable position.

The paper strip itself is designed to pool urine with latex microbeads coated with antibodies that can bind to hCG, a hormone produced during pregnancy.

The liquid and beads then flow onto the test strip, where more binding antibodies are present in the strip about halfway through.

The hCG-bound microbeads then also bind to these new antibodies, preventing them from moving forward and accumulating to produce color.

These are known as the lateral flow test and work in a similar way to at-home COVID testing kits.

Most pregnancy tests are mostly made of hard plastic, the main function of which is to hold the absorbent paper strip in a stable position.

Most pregnancy tests are mostly made of hard plastic, the main function of which is to hold the absorbent paper strip in a stable position.

Lara Solomon (pictured) came up with Hoopsy's idea after she decided to try for a baby when she was 45 and went down the path of embryo donation.  The procedure resulted in her using countless pregnancy tests to see if she was successful.

Lara Solomon (pictured) came up with Hoopsy’s idea after she decided to try for a baby when she was 45 and went down the path of embryo donation. The procedure resulted in her using countless pregnancy tests to see if she was successful.

Ms Solomon came up with the idea of ​​Hoopsey after she decided to try for a baby when she was 45 and went down the path of embryo donation.

The procedure resulted in her using countless pregnancy tests to see if she was successful.

She said: “Unfortunately, I had a weak positive test, but then I miscarried, which was a traumatic experience – I think I cried for days on end.”

“But something else came up when I was doing the tests at the hotel by myself – how many pregnancy tests I used.”

Hoopsy tests are more than 99 percent accurate from the day of your expected period and have a hCG sensitivity of 25 mIU/mL.

They have been clinically tested and laboratory tested to evaluate their accuracy and have been approved by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency.

The paper comes from responsibly managed forests, and some of it doesn’t biodegrade in landfill for 30 years, unlike plastic tests.

The tests can be bought in the UK in packs of three for £14.99, packs of five for £22.99 or packs of ten for £39.99. Hopsy website.

The biodegradable coating can be sprayed onto food to keep it fresh up to 50% longer and could replace plastic packaging in supermarkets.

The days of having to throw away leftover food can be a thing of the past thanks to a new biodegradable coating.

Researchers at the Rutgers School of Public Health have developed a coating that can be sprayed onto food and is said to keep food fresh up to 50% longer.

The team hopes that their plant-based coating will soon be able to replace plastic packaging in supermarkets.

The packaging uses fibers made from polysaccharides, the most common carbohydrate found in food.

Read more here

The fibers are infused with thyme oil, citric acid and nisin, natural antimicrobial ingredients that fight spoilage and pathogens such as E. coli and Listeria.

When you are ready to eat your food, the coating can be washed off with water and will decompose in the soil within three days.

The packaging uses fibers made from polysaccharides, the most common carbohydrate found in food. When you are ready to eat your food, the coating can be washed off with water and will decompose in the soil within three days.