Brain startup surpasses Elon Musk’s Neuralink implant in the brain of an ALS patient in New York

A 48-year-old patient in New York who is unable to move or speak due to severe ALS paralysis, became the first to receive a permanent brain implant that could allow him to communicate telepathically, a milestone for Synchron, a startup that has developed technology that has surpassed Elon Musk‘s Neuralink to the beat with his progress.

The procedure took place on July 6 at Mount Sinai West Medical Center in Manhattan, where a 1.5-inch lung implant – a brain-computer interface (BCI) in the form of a stentrod – made from wires and electrodes, was implanted into a patient’s brain without having to cut into their skull. or damage tissue.

“The first endovascular BCI implant in the US is an important clinical milestone that opens up new possibilities for patients with paralysis,” said Dr. This is stated in a statement by Tom Oxley, CEO and founder of Synchron.

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“The first endovascular BCI implant in the US is an important clinical milestone that opens up new possibilities for patients with paralysis,” said Dr. This is stated in a statement by Tom Oxley, CEO and founder of Synchron. The photo shows the place where the operation took place.

“Our technology is for millions of people who have lost the ability to use their hands to control digital devices. We are excited to bring to market a scalable BCI solution that has the potential to change many lives.”

This procedure was part of the Synchron COMMAND study, which is underway in the US under the first FDA-issued experimental device (IDE) exemption for a company testing a permanently implantable brain computer interface.

Synchron has already reported that the technology is safe at the 12-month mark in four patients in the Australian trial.

The Australian patients experienced no side effects and were able to perform tasks such as shopping online and sending WhatsApp messages using the implant.

“The implantation procedure went very well and the patient was able to return home 48 hours after the operation.”  This is a close-up of a tiny cylindrical device in a patient's vessel in his brain.

“The implantation procedure went very well and the patient was able to return home 48 hours after the operation.” This is a close-up of a tiny cylindrical device in a patient’s vessel in his brain.

“This is an incredibly exciting milestone for this field because of its implications and huge potential,” Shahram Majidi, MD, the neurointerventional surgeon who performed the procedure and assistant professor of neurosurgery, neurology and radiology at Mount Icahn School of Medicine. Sinai,” the statement said.

“The implantation procedure went very well and the patient was able to return home 48 hours after the operation.”

“This is an incredibly exciting milestone for this field because of its implications and tremendous potential,” Shahram Majidi, MD, the neurointerventional surgeon who performed the procedure, said in a statement.  Pictured is a small device from Synchron

“This is an incredibly exciting milestone for this field because of its implications and tremendous potential,” Shahram Majidi, MD, the neurointerventional surgeon who performed the procedure, said in a statement. Pictured is a small device from Synchron

This achievement puts it ahead of Neuralink: as of January 2022, Musk’s firm is still proven success with chips implanted in a pig and a monkey, and posted a vacancy for the director of clinical trials in the United States.

Neuralink is working on a much more powerful, extremely tiny implant that can be placed in the brain via a robot-assisted surgical procedure.

NEURALINK: ILONA MASK’S GAME FOR COMPUTER-BRAIN INTERFACES

Elon Musk’s Neuralink is working to connect the human brain to a machine interface, creating micron-sized devices.

Neuralink was listed in California as a medical research company in July 2016, and Musk funded the company largely on his own.

It will work on what Musk calls “neural cord” technology, implanting tiny electrodes into the brain that will one day be able to upload and download thoughts.

Initially, the technology will be used to help people suffering from severe degenerative brain diseases such as ALS, but it could be used more widely in the coming years.

“We hope to have this in our first people — people with severe spinal cord injuries such as tetraplegia and quadriplegia — next year, pending FDA approval,” Musk said during a live interview at the board summit. The Wall Street Journal. .

The news of its competitor comes after Paul Merolla, who helped launch Neuralink in 2016 and worked on its chip design program, left the company, two sources said. Reuters.

During the procedure, the doctor made an incision in the patient’s neck and inserted the stentrod through a catheter through the jugular vein into a blood vessel located in the motor cortex, which is part of the frontal lobe of the brain.

When the catheter was removed, the stentrode, a small hollow wire mesh in the shape of a cylinder, opened up and began to merge with the outer edges of the blood vessel.

It can then detect and wirelessly transmit the intent of the movement thanks to its own digital language, Synchron, allowing Severely paralyzed patients can control their personal devices using point-and-click, hands-free.

According to Synchron, the stentrode uses 16 electrodes to monitor brain activity and record neuronal activity when a person is thinking.

The second procedure connects the stentrod with a wire to a computing device implanted in the patient’s chest.

To do this, the surgeon must create a tunnel for the wire and a pocket for the device under the patient’s skin, similar to how it is done to insert a pacemaker.

The stentrod reads signals when neurons fire in the brain, and the computing device amplifies these signals and sends them to a computer or smartphone via Bluetooth.

The test will assess the impact of everyday tasks such as texting, email, online shopping and access to telehealth services, as well as the ability to live independently.

Founded in 2016 and headquartered in New York, Synchron describes itself as a “leader in implantable neural interface technology.”

It states that further applications of this technology could include the treatment and diagnosis of conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, depression and hypertension.