The 560-million-year-old fossil, named after David Attenborough, was Earth’s first predatory animal.

Fossil of the earliest known carnivore discovered in Leicester was named after Sir David Attenborough.

Named Auroralumina attenboroughii, the 560-million-year-old primitive jellyfish was found in Charnwood Forest, near Leicester, a city with which Sir David has a long association.

The 96-year-old, who used to hunt fossils in the area and is credited with raising awareness of Ediacaran fossils in the forest, said he was “really thrilled.”

The researchers say this specimen is the first of its kind and is believed to be the earliest creature with a skeleton.

The creature was about seven inches tall and had to be tied to the seafloor on a beige “stalk”, using flame-colored tentacles to catch food.

The first part of the name is Latin for “morning lantern” in recognition of its great age and resemblance to a burning torch.

The fossil known as Auroralumina attenboroughii.

A piece of history: A fossil of the earliest known carnivore (pictured) discovered in Leicester was named after Sir David Attenborough.

Named Auroralumina attenboroughii, the 560-million-year-old primitive jellyfish (shown by the artist) was found in Charnwood Forest, near Leicester, a city with which Sir David has a long association.

Named Auroralumina attenboroughii, the 560-million-year-old primitive jellyfish (shown by the artist) was found in Charnwood Forest, near Leicester, a city with which Sir David has a long association.

The 96-year-old (pictured), who used to hunt for fossils in the area and is credited with raising awareness of Ediacaran fossils in the forest, said he was

The 96-year-old (pictured), who used to hunt for fossils in the area and is credited with raising awareness of Ediacaran fossils in the forest, said he was “really excited.”

Fossil of a frog beetle, named “Belle Attenborough” after the famous naturalist.

Auroralumina attenboroughii is not the first creature named after Sir David Attenborough.

A new species of frog beetle that lived nearly 49 million years ago in present-day Garfield County. Coloradoalso received the name of a cult naturalist.

Pulchritudo attenboroughi, or “beauty of Attenborough”, was announced in August 2021 in the magazine. Articles on paleontologyalthough a fossil of the prehistoric creature has been on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science since 1995.

Sir David said: “When I was at school in Leicester, I was an avid fossil hunter.

“The rocks in which auroralumin is now found were then considered so ancient that they date back to long before life appeared on the planet.

“So I never looked for fossils there. A few years later, a boy from my school found one and proved the experts wrong.

“He was rewarded that his name was given to his discovery. Now I’ve almost caught up with him and I’m really excited.”

This specimen was found by Roger Mason, after whom Charnia masoni was named.

He and a group of schoolchildren were rock climbing in the Charnwood Forest quarry in 1957 when they made their discovery.

Dr. Phil Wilby, head of paleontology at the British Geological Survey, is one of the scientists behind the latest find.

He said: “It is generally accepted that modern animal groups such as jellyfish appeared 540 million years ago as a result of the Cambrian explosion.

“But this predator is 20 million years older than him. This is the earliest known creature with a skeleton.

“We’ve only found one so far, but it’s very interesting to know that there must be others with clues to when complex life began on Earth.”

According to the study, the creature belongs to a group that includes corals, jellyfish and anemones living on Earth today.

In 2007, Dr. Wilby and others spent more than a week cleaning the surface of a 100-square-meter rock using toothbrushes and high-pressure water jets.

In a full-surface rubber cast of more than 1,000 fossils, one stood out.

According to the study, the creature belongs to a group that includes corals, jellyfish and anemones living on Earth today.

According to the study, the creature belongs to a group that includes corals, jellyfish and anemones living on Earth today.

Dr Phil Wilby (pictured), head of paleontology at the British Geological Survey, is one of the scientists behind the latest find.

Dr Phil Wilby (pictured), head of paleontology at the British Geological Survey, is one of the scientists behind the latest find.

Dr Frankie Dunn of Oxford University’s Natural History Museum said: “This is very different from other fossils in Charnwood Forest and around the world.

“Most of the other fossils from that time have extinct body forms, and it is not clear how they are related to living animals.

“It clearly has a skeleton with densely spaced tentacles that would swing through the water to grab passing food, much like corals and sea anemones do today.

“This is unlike anything else we found in the fossil record at the time.”

Dr. Dunn called A. attenboroughii “a lonely little fossil.” It originated from shallower water than others found at Charnwood.

She said: “The ancient rocks at Charnwood are very similar to those deposited in the deep ocean on the slopes of volcanic islands, as today at the foot of Montserrat in the Caribbean.

In 2007, Dr. Wilby and others spent more than a week cleaning the surface of a 100-square-meter rock using toothbrushes and high-pressure water jets.  In the rubber mold of the entire surface, which captured more than 1000 fossils, one stood out

In 2007, Dr. Wilby and others spent more than a week cleaning the surface of a 100-square-meter rock using toothbrushes and high-pressure water jets. In the rubber mold of the entire surface, which captured more than 1000 fossils, one stood out

A. attenboroughii was dated at the British Geological Survey headquarters using zircons in the surrounding rocks.

A. attenboroughii was dated at the British Geological Survey headquarters using zircons in the surrounding rocks.

“All the fossils on the cleaned rock surface were attached to the seafloor and were toppled in one direction by the volcanic ash flow sweeping the volcano’s underwater base, except for one, A. attenboroughii.

“It lies at a strange angle and has lost its foundation, so it looks like it was swept down the slope by a flood.”

A. attenboroughii was dated at the British Geological Survey headquarters using zircons in the surrounding rock.

Zircon is a tiny radioactive mineral that acts like a geological clock as it allows geologists to estimate how much uranium and lead are present. Based on this, they can determine exactly how old the stone is.

Dr. Dunn said: “The Cambrian Explosion was wonderful. It is known as the time when the anatomy of living groups of animals was fixed for the next half a billion years.

“Our discovery shows that the body structure of cnidarians was recorded at least 20 million years ago, so this is very interesting and raises many new questions.”

The find was reported in Ecology of nature and evolution.

THE FIRST FLOWERING PLANT ON EARTH

It looks like a magnolia and will be useful in any front garden.

But this flower is the mother (and father) of all modern flowering plants, and was watched by dinosaurs 140 million years ago.

Such ancient fossils have never been found, so scientists recreated them by analyzing every plant family on Earth for six years.

We now know that the flowers in our gardens come from a single flower with three separate whorls of multi-layered petals and male and female reproductive organs.

Its petals lie open because its main pollinator was probably the beetle, and bees were just developing at that time and did not yet require tubular flowers like snapdragons.

It looks like a magnolia and will be useful in any front garden.  But this flower is the mother (and father) of all modern flowering plants, and was watched by dinosaurs 140 million years ago.

It looks like a magnolia and will be useful in any front garden. But this flower is the mother (and father) of all modern flowering plants, and was watched by dinosaurs 140 million years ago.

Flowering plants appeared on our planet relatively recently, brightening up a dull landscape where ferns, horsetails and mosses used to dominate.

They now make up 90 percent of all land plants, and scientists say this is the most accurate picture of their common ancestor.

Dr Emily Bales, who worked on the study, said: “This is by far the best representation of a flower that is the ancestor of every modern flower we see today and that could have existed when dinosaurs were still on the planet, which is really exciting. .

“It has three concentric circles of petal-like organs, unlike most modern plants. We don’t know exactly what color this flower would be, but I think it’s very beautiful.”

The origin of early-flowering plants, called angiosperms, remains one of the biggest mysteries in biology, almost 140 years after Charles Darwin called their rapid growth during the Cretaceous Period a “disgusting mystery.”

The photo, published in the journal Nature Communications, is unlike anything that exists today, and none of the previously proposed ideas.

It has three whorls or concentric circles of petals like the magnolia it resembles, making it unusual among modern plants.

Only about 20 percent now match this, with plants typically having fewer layers, such as the two whorls seen in lilies.