Scientists find unexplained lines of holes 2.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.

Baffled scientists discover “perfectly aligned” holes punched into the ground 2.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean that look like man-made excavations.

  • Researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have discovered unexplained holes in the seafloor 2.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean.
  • “These holes from this region have been previously reported, but their origin remains a mystery,” the scientists wrote in a Facebook post, asking users for help.
  • Users say the holes could be from a rover, a crab, aliens, or simply the natural result of sediment and water moving across the seafloor.
  • The Mid-Atlantic Ridge spans the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and stretches for 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world.

Scientists have discovered unexplained mysterious holes in the seafloor 2.7 miles below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. facebook to users to help them identify the unique indents that form a straight line.

“Okay Facebookers, time to take off your scientist hats!” they wrote at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Ocean Exploration on Facebook. page.

“During Saturday’s #Okeanos dive, we observed several of these sub-linear sets of holes in the sediments. These holes have been previously reported from this region, but their origin remains a mystery. Although they look almost man-made, the little piles of sediment around the holes give the impression that they were dug up by… something.

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“During Saturday’s #Okeanos dive, we observed several of these sub-linear sets of holes in the sediments. These holes have been previously reported from the region, but their origin remains a mystery,” NOAA scientists wrote on Facebook.

The researchers are participating in NOAA's Voyage to the Ridge 2022, a series of three ocean explorations that include mapping and ROV to better understand the deep waters around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

The researchers are participating in NOAA’s Voyage to the Ridge 2022, a series of three ocean explorations that include mapping and ROV to better understand the deep waters around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

“What is YOUR hypothesis?” they asked users about holes found near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, prompting a very wide range of responses.

The researchers are participating in NOAA’s Journey to the Ridge 2022, a series of three ocean studies that include mapping and ROV to better understand the deep waters around the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the Azores Plateau and the Charlie Gibbs Fault Zone. .

“What is YOUR hypothesis?” they asked users about holes found near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

More than 60 Facebook users have commented and presented a number of different theories as to what might have created the noticeable, rather monotonous depressions on the ocean floor.

“I wonder if any company can take samples of the seabed,” one user wrote. “That might explain the straight lines and spacing between the holes. Especially if you have seen others in the region. The only thing is, everything else around doesn’t look like it’s been disturbed.

“I wonder if any company can take samples of the seabed,” one Facebook user wrote.

“I wonder if any company can take samples of the seabed,” one Facebook user wrote. “That might explain the straight lines and spacing between the holes.” The image above shows a hazy arc above the tail of the NOAA Okeanos Explorer.

Pictured above, the Deep Discoverer ROV traverses the seafloor of the volcano explored during the fourth dive of the Journey to the Ridge 2022 expedition.

Pictured above, the Deep Discoverer ROV traverses the seafloor of the volcano explored during the fourth dive of the Journey to the Ridge 2022 expedition.

“Upwelling! Is fresh water from a surface source seething? It’s like there’s a rock there, allowing the flowing water to break through in such a linear fashion.” commented the second user.

Another used suggested, “Maybe some kind of crab.”

A user shared a meme that says, “I’m not saying it was aliens… but it was aliens.”

One commentator offered a less uncanny explanation: “It seems to me that sediment is sinking or water is leaking from a crack in a geological shelf or cave roof.

“I suspect that either the ancient coral or some sedimentary rock structure beneath it has a void from which material is washed out even further. I would start looking to see if there are any caves or deformations on the seabed.”

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge spans the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and stretches for 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world and one of the most impressive geological features on Earth.

Because most of it is underwater, it remains largely unexplored.

It is also the site of frequent earthquakes and home to attractive hydrothermal vents that can form where magma provides heat as it rises to the seafloor.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge spans the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and stretches for 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world and one of the most impressive geological features on Earth.  The picture above shows the NOAA Okeanos Explorer.

The Mid-Atlantic Ridge spans the Atlantic Ocean from north to south and stretches for 10,000 miles, making it the longest mountain range in the world and one of the most impressive geological features on Earth. The picture above shows the NOAA Okeanos Explorer.

The image above shows the expected route of Okeanos Explorer during the second Journey to the Ridge 2022 expedition.  This series of expeditions will provide high resolution information about the features of the seabed and the opportunity to explore this little known area in real time.

The image above shows the expected route of Okeanos Explorer during the second Journey to the Ridge 2022 expedition. This series of expeditions will provide high resolution information about the features of the seabed and the opportunity to explore this little known area in real time.