Tonight is your best chance of seeing the Delta Aquarid meteor shower thanks to the new moon.

If you love stargazing, be sure to check out the sky this evening.

While the Delta Aquariid meteor shower officially peaks on Friday night, tonight is your best chance of seeing shooting stars.

This is because from 18:55 BST tonight there will be a New Moon – a phase of the Moon in which the illuminated side faces the Sun, making our lunar satellite invisible in the night sky.

While Delta Aquariids can be hard to spot, the lack of light pollution from the new moon will make any shooting stars really stand out in the night sky.

While the Delta Aquarid meteor shower is officially peaking this weekend, tonight is your best chance of seeing shooting stars.

Tonight will be the New Moon, the phase of the Moon in which the illuminated side faces the Sun, making our lunar satellite invisible in the night sky.

Tonight will be the New Moon – the phase of the Moon, in which the illuminated side is turned towards the Sun, making our lunar satellite invisible in the night sky.

Tips for Watching the Delta Aquarid Meteor Shower

The Southern Delta Aquariids are best seen in the Southern Hemisphere and the southern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

If you want to see them, NASA advises: “Find a spot away from city or street lights.

“Get ready with a sleeping bag, blanket or sun lounger.

“Lie on your back and look up, looking up at the sky as much as possible.

“Looking halfway between the horizon and the zenith and at a 45 degree angle to the constellation Aquarius will increase your chances of seeing the southern Delta Aquariids.

“In less than 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adjust and you will begin to see meteors.

“Be patient – the show will run until dawn, so you’ll have plenty of time to catch a glimpse.”

“Southern Delta Aquarids are active from mid-July and are visible until the end of August,” NASA explains.

“These faint meteors are hard to spot, and if the Moon is visible, you won’t be able to see them.”

Meteors come from the remains of comets and broken asteroids.

As comets orbit the Sun, the dust they emit is gradually spread in a dusty plume around their orbits.

As the Earth passes through these debris trails, the particles collide with our atmosphere, where they disintegrate, creating beautiful streaks of fire in the sky.

The pieces of space debris that interact with our atmosphere and create the Delta Aquarids come from comet 96P/Machholz, which orbits the sun about once every five years.

Comet Machholtz was discovered by Donald Machholtz in 1986, NASA explains.

“Comet Machholtz’s nucleus is about 4 miles (6.4 km) across (slightly over half the size of the object thought to have killed the dinosaurs).”

The radiant of meteors – the point in the sky from which they appear to emanate – lies in the constellation of Aquarius, which gives the shower its name, along with Delta, the third brightest star in the constellation.

“Note: The constellation the meteor shower is named after only serves to help viewers determine which shower they are seeing on a given night,” NASA added.

“The constellation is not the source of the meteors.”

The new moon is an invisible phase of the moon, in which the illuminated side faces the sun, and the night side faces the earth.  While the Delta Aquarids can be hard to spot, the lack of light pollution from the new moon will make any shooting stars really stand out in the night sky.

The new moon is an invisible phase of the moon, in which the illuminated side faces the sun, and the night side faces the earth. While the Delta Aquarids can be hard to spot, the lack of light pollution from the new moon will make any shooting stars really stand out in the night sky.

The pieces of space debris that interact with our atmosphere and form the Delta Aquarids come from comet 96P/Machholz, which orbits the Sun about once every five years.

The pieces of space debris that interact with our atmosphere and form the Delta Aquarids come from comet 96P/Machholz, which orbits the Sun about once every five years.

Any shooting stars will be especially visible this evening due to the New Moon.

Like the Earth, the Moon has a day side and a night side that changes as the Moon rotates.

The Sun always illuminates half of the Moon while the other half remains dark, but how much we can see of the illuminated half changes as the Moon moves in its orbit.

The new moon is an invisible phase of the moon, in which the illuminated side faces the sun, and the night side faces the earth.

The Southern Delta Aquariids are best seen in the Southern Hemisphere and the southern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere.

Like the Earth, the Moon has a day side and a night side that changes as the Moon rotates.  The Sun always illuminates half of the Moon while the other half remains dark, but how much can we see in this illuminated half that changes as the Moon moves in its orbit.

Like the Earth, the Moon has a day side and a night side that changes as the Moon rotates. The Sun always illuminates half of the Moon while the other half remains dark, but how much can we see in this illuminated half that changes as the Moon moves in its orbit.

If you want to see them, NASA advises: “Find a spot away from city or street lights.

“Get ready with a sleeping bag, blanket or sun lounger.

“Lie on your back and look up, looking up at the sky as much as possible.

“Looking halfway between the horizon and the zenith and at a 45 degree angle to the constellation Aquarius will increase your chances of seeing the southern Delta Aquariids.

“In less than 30 minutes in the dark, your eyes will adjust and you will begin to see meteors.

“Be patient – the show will run until dawn, so you’ll have plenty of time to catch a glimpse.”

REMAINING METEORITE SHOWERS IN 2022

Delta Aquarids: July 30 – 25 at 1 pm – stable flow for several days

Alpha Capricornidae: July 30 – 5 per hour – yellow slow fireballs.

Perseids: August 12-13 – 100 per hour – Bright, fast meteors with trains

Draconids: October 8-9 – 10 an hour – from comet Giacobini-Zimmer.

Orionids: October 21-22 – 25 per hour – Fast with good trains

Taurids: October 10-11 (Southern), November 12-13 (Northern) – 5 per hour – Very slow

Leonidas: November 17-18 – 10 an hour – Fast and bright

Twins: December 14-15 – 150 per hour – Bright and plentiful, few trains

Ursids: December 22-23 – 10 an hour – Light rain

Notes: Dates refer to the peak of each shower.