A YouTuber claims three Samsung smartphones have had batteries explode due to the recent heat wave in the UK.

The renowned tech writer, who was one of many who battled the heatwave that swept the UK last week, claims that his three Samsung phones exploded due to extreme heat.

Arun Maini told DailyMail.com that the batteries in his Samsung Galaxy S6, Galaxy Note 8 and Galaxy S10 were three times as large, causing the back cover to move off each phone, while none of the more than 600 smartphones in his collection was depleted.

The YouTube star isn’t the only one with a damaged Samsung, as several people in the UK have mentioned experiencing the same problem, with one user saying it happened to his Samsung, which had been sitting in a closet untouched for a while.

Recent events echo what happened to the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7, which was found to have spontaneously exploded and caused at least 112 fires.

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A YouTuber who reviews technology has tweeted images of three Samsung smartphones that he says were damaged by the heatwave as batteries exploded due to swelling.

The UK has seen record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest temperature reaching 104 degrees on 19 July.

And it seems that the heat was too much even for Samsung smartphones.

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini’s tweet, saying he was facing a similar issue.

I can confirm the same. Recently my Note 10+, Z fold 2 and S20 batteries swelled,” Khan said in a tweet.

Another user said that this happened to his Samsung, which sat untouched in a closet for a while.

Another user said that this happened to his Samsung, which sat untouched in a closet for a while.

The smartphone looks like it was split in half due to an exploding battery, claims the user.

The smartphone looks like it was split in half due to an exploding battery, claims the user.

“This has never happened to other phones in the collection, regardless of their age. Samsung devices only.”

Some have speculated that the heat in the UK is different, as one Twitter user said that houses are made to trap heat, much like an oven, and this could cause batteries to overheat.

Hussam also shared his thoughts, noting that “Samsung has not tested its phones in high temperature environments.” He claims to live in Saudi Arabia.

News of Samsung’s exploding smartphones may remind many of the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco, which highlighted the power-up issues in much thinner phones that were rushed to market in August 2016 in an attempt to outdo Apple’s new iPhone.

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini's tweet, saying he was facing a similar issue.

Another tech reviewer, Zaryab Khan, commented on Maini’s tweet, saying he was facing a similar issue.

The UK has seen record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest temperature reaching 104 degrees on 19 July.  And it seems that the heat was too strong for even Samsung smartphones to withstand.

The UK has seen record high temperatures for more than a week, with the highest temperature reaching 104 degrees on 19 July. And it seems that the heat was too strong for even Samsung smartphones to withstand.

As soon as rumors surfaced that Apple’s latest device won’t be the biggest innovation of the year, Samsung executives “pushed vendors to tighter deadlines despite a plethora of new features.”

Shortly after the phones were released and bought, reports began to surface of phones catching fire.

Recent events echo what happened to the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (pictured), which was found to spontaneously explode and was blamed for at least 112 fires.

Recent events echo what happened to the 2016 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 (pictured), which was found to spontaneously explode and was blamed for at least 112 fires.

Just a month after launch, mobile chief DJ Koh held a press conference in Seoul, South Korea where he announced a recall of 2.5 million Galaxy Note 7 devices, which will eventually be replaced by the new and more secure Note 7.

While the firm has been praised for its savvy, it has also been criticized for announcing these plans before developing a strategy to collect millions of phones in 10 countries and provide a replacement for every person.

A year later, Samsung was sued by at least 1,900 users in South Korea seeking $822,000 in damages.

However, the recall cost the company $5.3 billion, and another $19 billion when the company scrapped the Note 7 entirely just two months after they started to explode.