The Met Office report shows that sea levels in the UK are rising by 0.2 inches per year.

new with office The report showed that sea levels are rising faster than a hundred years ago.

The rate of increase has reached 0.2 inches (5.2 mm) per year in some parts of the country, which is three times more than at the beginning of the last century (1.5 mm per year).

The Met Office’s ‘State of the UK Climate 2021’ report also states that sea levels have risen by about 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) since the 1900s.

As sea levels around the UK rise, more coastal land is exposed to stronger and more frequent storm surge and wind wave action.

BUT recent training found that 200,000 homes and businesses in England could be destroyed by rising sea levels by the 2050s.

“Sea levels around the UK continue to rise due to increased rates of ice loss from Greenland and Antarctica, as well as continued glacier mass loss and ocean warming,” said Dr Svetlana Evreeva of the National Oceanographic Center.

“Last year, storm surges over 1.5m were observed during Storm Arwen, but extreme sea levels were avoided as they occurred during low water and ATV.”

A recent study found that 200,000 homes and businesses in England could be lost due to rising sea levels by the 2050s. In Happiesburg, Norfolk (pictured), houses that were once 20 feet from the sea now stand on the edge of a cliff.

Rates of sea level rise in millimeters per year measured by tide gauges across the UK from 1991 to 2020.  Measurements are corrected for land movement due to isostatic adjustment of glaciers.

Storm surge in meters recorded by UK tide gauges at 0600 UTC on 27 November 2021 during Storm Arwen.  The values ​​presented are the heights recorded by the tide gauges minus the predicted heights due to the astronomical tide.

Left: Rates of sea level rise in millimeters per year measured by tide gauges across the UK from 1991 to 2020. Right: Storm surge in meters recorded by UK gauges at 0600 UTC on 27 November 2021 during Storm Arwen.

The maximum temperature recorded in 2021 was 90.1°F (32.2°C) and is actually considered relatively low compared to other years in recent decades.  However, this is still significantly warmer than the average hottest day of the year for the period 1961–1990, which was 88.5 °F (31.4 °C).

The maximum temperature recorded in 2021 was 90.1°F (32.2°C) and is actually considered relatively low compared to other years in recent decades. However, this is still significantly warmer than the average hottest day of the year for the period 1961–1990, which was 88.5 °F (31.4 °C).

WHICH PARTS OF THE ENGLISH COAST WILL BE MOST AFFECTED BY COASTAL EROSION?

Figures released in 2019 by fused.com based on data collected by the National Environmental Protection Agency’s Coastal Erosion Risk Mapping project show that the following areas of England’s coastline will be most affected by erosion:

COASTAL EROSION: AREAS MOST RISK BY 2040
COASTAL ZONE: THE EARTH IS BLOWING AFTER 20 YEARS:
1. Happiesburg, Norfolk 318 feet (97 m)
2. Kessingland, Suffolk 230 feet (70 m)
3. Hornsey, East Riding of Yorkshire 223 feet (68 m)
4. Weathernsey, East Riding of Yorkshire 200 feet (61 m)
5. Sunderland, Tyne and Wear 131 ft (40 m)
6. Filey, North Yorkshire 131 ft (40 m)
7. Camber, East Sussex 131 ft (40 m)

The State of the UK Climate 2021 is an annual report that looks at climate and important weather events over the past year.

Including Storm Arwen, which caused devastating flooding across the country last November.

Posted today in International Journal of Climatologythis shows that the higher temperatures the country has experienced are “almost normal”.

The maximum temperature recorded in 2021 was 90.1°F (32.2°C), which is actually considered relatively cool compared to other years in recent decades.

However, this is still significantly warmer than the average hottest day of the year for the period 1961-1990, which was 88.5 °F (31.4 °C).

Mike Kendon of the Met Office’s National Climate Information Centre, said: “Had this happened just over three decades ago, it would have been one of the warmest years in the UK on record.”

The winter and spring of 2021 were comparable to the period from 1961 to 1990, however the summer and fall were significantly warmer, the latter by 3.2 °F (1.8 °C).

This makes 2021 the 18th warmest year in the UK in a series since 1884.

Meteorologists have also found that the country is warming slightly faster than the global temperature increase, with the last decade being 1.8 °F (1.0 °C) warmer than the 1961–1990 climate period.

Mike Kendon added: “While 1°C warming may not sound like much, it has meant that peak temperatures such as the 32.2°C we saw in 2021 are commonplace, not exceptional.

“This is especially drastic given the record-breaking heatwave that the UK experienced just last week.”

Annual mean temperature for the UK plotted against global annual mean temperature (HadCRUT5), 1884–2021  The country is warming slightly faster than the global average

Annual mean temperature for the UK plotted against global annual mean temperature (HadCRUT5), 1884–2021 The country is warming slightly faster than the global average

Average day of the year with first leaf and bare tree for four common shrub or tree species (elder, hawthorn, drooping birch and oak) from 1999 to 2021.  Changes in the natural timing of these events can affect their interactions with other species that depend on them.

Average day of the year with first leaf and bare tree for four common shrub or tree species (elder, hawthorn, drooping birch and oak) from 1999 to 2021. Changes in the natural timing of these events can affect their interactions with other species that depend on them.

Climate change has also caused spring to arrive earlier, as evidenced by “first leaf” dates recorded for common trees such as elderberry.

However, trees that normally release their leaves late in the season, such as oak, have been delayed by an unusually cold April.

In April, the average temperature in Central England was lower than in March – a phenomenon that has occurred only 15 times in the past 363 years.

In addition, a particularly warm October meant that the trees of all the species covered in the report later lost their leaves.

Changes in the natural timing of these events can affect their interaction with other species that depend on them.

Record temperature of 40°C in the UK could be the norm in 30 years

It may have been the hottest day in British history last week, but researchers warn that 40°C temperatures won’t be out of the ordinary for the next three decades.

A new study suggests that extreme heatwaves will increase by more than 30 percent in the coming years after they are caused by burning fossil fuels and other human activities.

Last Tuesday was the hottest day ever recorded in the UK. Mercury above 40.3°C (104°F).

But it serves as an early preview of what forecasters think will be typical summer weather by 2050.

The new study, which analyzed atmospheric circulation patterns and greenhouse gases, looked at data from just over a year ago, when nearly 1,500 people died as average temperatures in the US and Canada more than doubled.

Read more here

Warning: A new study suggests that extreme heatwaves will increase by more than 30 percent over the next three decades.  The shading in the image above represents surface air temperature anomalies, and the green vector represents the jet stream.  The two blue vectors show that the heatwave that hit the US last year was related to anomalous circulation in the North Pacific and the Arctic.

Warning: A new study suggests that extreme heatwaves will increase by more than 30 percent over the next three decades. The shading in the image above represents surface air temperature anomalies, and the green vector represents the jet stream. The two blue vectors show that the heatwave that hit the US last year was related to anomalous circulation in the North Pacific and the Arctic.