Freezing temperatures rise to record levels over Swiss Alps

Meteorologists said the freezing point in the Swiss Alps rose to a new high and broke a 27-year-old record as record heatwaves continue to rage across Europe.

According to experts, the weather balloon had to rise to a height of 17,008 feet (5,184 meters) above the mountain range to reach 0°C.

This was nearly 230 feet (70 m) higher than the previous Swiss record of 16,788 feet (5,117 m) measured on July 20, 1995, and 1,230 feet (375 m) above the summit of Europe’s highest peak, Mont Blanc in the French Alps. .

French meteorologists also measured 0°C at 16,400 feet (5,000 m) on Sunday over Bordeaux in the west before warm air moved east towards the Alps.

It is extremely rare in Europe to measure freezing temperatures above 16,400 feet (5,000 m).

Warming: Freezing temperatures in the Swiss Alps have risen to a new high and smashed a 27-year-old record, meteorologists said, as record heatwaves continue to rage across Europe. It is now nearly 230 feet (70 m) taller than the previous Swiss record set in July 1995.

The weather balloon had to rise to 17,008 feet above the mountain range to reach 0°C.  Insulating foam covers part of the Rhone Glacier in the Swiss Alps to prevent it from melting.

The weather balloon had to rise to 17,008 feet above the mountain range to reach 0°C. Insulating foam covers part of the Rhone Glacier in the Swiss Alps to prevent it from melting.

HOW IS GLOBAL WARMING AFFECTING GLACIER THAT?

Global warming is causing temperatures to rise all over the world.

This is especially noticeable at latitudes closer to the poles.

Rising temperatures, permafrost, glaciers and ice sheets are struggling to maintain integrity in the face of a warmer climate.

If the temperature has risen more than a degree above pre-industrial levels, the ice continues to melt.

For example, the melting of ice on the Greenland ice sheet leads to the formation of “meltwater lakes”, which then contribute to melting.

Some animal and plant species rely heavily on the cold conditions that glaciers provide and migrate to high altitudes in search of suitable habitat.

This puts a serious strain on ecosystems as more animals and species live in the ever-shrinking region.

In addition to the pressure on the environment, the absence of ice in the mountains definitely increases the risk of landslides and volcanic eruptions.

To date, the only time he has crossed this height in the Swiss Alps was in 1995.

This zero degree limit is measured by weather balloons that are launched twice a day from nearby Payerne.

Swiss glaciologist Matthias Huss said this month that rising temperatures are causing freshwater glaciers to melt faster than ever.

“The glaciers in the Alps are completely different from what we have seen before. I am very concerned about the situation,” he tweeted.

“Measurements taken today at Grisgletcher show that even with respect to the previous record in 2003, we are one month ahead of melting.

And no relief is expected.

Some animal and plant species rely heavily on the cold conditions that glaciers provide and migrate to high altitudes in search of suitable habitat.

This puts a serious strain on ecosystems as more animals and species live in the ever-shrinking region.

Meanwhile, in the Alps, the border between Switzerland and Italy has shifted due to a melting glacier, calling into question the whereabouts of the Italian mountain lodge.

The retreat of the Theodulus Glacier means the border has crept up to the Rifugio Guide del Cervino, a visitor’s refuge near the 11,417-foot (3,480 m) peak Testa Grigia, and is gradually passing under the building.

Last month, new study warns Alps snow days will halve without faster action stop changing of the climate.

The researchers said that the southern Alpine countries, including parts France, Italyand Slovenia would be particularly affected without emission reductions.

It is extremely rare in Europe to measure freezing temperatures above 16,400 feet (5,000 m).  Pictured is Steisee, canton of Bern in the Swiss Alps.

It is extremely rare in Europe to measure freezing temperatures above 16,400 feet (5,000 m). Pictured is Steisee, canton of Bern in the Swiss Alps.

Swiss glaciologist Matthias Huss said this month that rising temperatures are causing freshwater glaciers to melt faster than ever.

Swiss glaciologist Matthias Huss said this month that rising temperatures are causing freshwater glaciers to melt faster than ever.

NUMBER OF SNOW DAYS (d) LOST WITH GLOBAL WARMING 1.5-2°C
Country 500m 1500m 2500m 3500m
Austria -7 days (-21%) -17 days (-16%) -25 days (-ten%) -37 days (-ten%)
Bosnia and Herzegovina -8 days (-27%) -24 days (-29%) AFTER AFTER
Croatia -5 days (-28%) -26 days (-thirty%) AFTER AFTER
France -2d (-25%) -16 days (-twenty%) -26 days (-12%) -44 days (-13%)
Germany -9 days (-25%) -22 days (-19%) -33 days (-fourteen%) AFTER
Italy -3 days (-26%) -15 days (-19%) -26 days (-eleven%) -45 days (-13%)
Slovenia -6 days (-26%) -23 days (-28%) -31 days (-13%) AFTER
Switzerland -5 days (-22%) -18 days (-fifteen%) -27 days (-eleven%) -57 days (-16%)

For example, if the planet warms by 7.2-9°F (4-5°C), Slovenia could lose 54 days of snow a year – 68 percent – at 4,920 feet (1,500 m), while France could lose 116 days of snow. days at 11,480 feet (3,500 m), or 34% of snowy days.

But if the goals of the Paris Agreement on emissions were met, it would save 80% of the current days with snow cover, experts say.

They added that the loss of snow would affect the ski industry, nature and water use downstream, and would itself cause further warming.

Scientists say the planet has warmed by 2.16°F (1.2°C) due to human activities and swift and concerted action will be required to reach the Paris Agreement target and stay “well below” 3.6°F (2 °C).

PARIS AGREEMENT: GLOBAL AGREEMENT TO LIMIT TEMPERATURE RISES THROUGH CARBON REDUCTION TARGETS

The Paris Agreement, first signed in 2015, is an international agreement to control and limit climate change.

He hopes to keep the rise in global mean temperature below 2°C (3.6°F) “and continue efforts to limit temperature rise to 1.5°C (2.7°F)”.

It looks like the more ambitious goal of limiting global warming to 1.5°C (2.7°F) may be more important than ever, according to a previous study that claims 25 percent of the world could face a significant increase in dry conditions. .

The Paris Agreement on Climate Change has four main goals for reducing emissions:

1) Long-term goal to keep global average temperature rise well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels.

2) Strive to limit the rise to 1.5°C as this will significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change.

3) Governments agree on the need to peak global emissions as soon as possible, recognizing that it will take longer for developing countries.

4) After that, take quick cuts according to the best available science.

Source: European Commission.