Student creates a platform to help the world be aware of the war in Ukraine

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Bernard Mördler points to his computer screen when an air raid alert appears.

“Lugansk is now under fire,” Merdler explained.

The 21-year-old student and programmer has developed a platform called Ukraine Sirens Alert to inform the world as quickly as possible. Russian invasion grind.

The alert system not only warns of incoming missiles, but also provides real-time data on shelling, minefields and other threats that may affect civilians stuck in a war. Much of the information is collected from government, military and open source sources.

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“It’s like an octopus with all its tentacles picking up everything data in one place so that users can find it in an easily accessible place,” Mördler said.

Bernard Merdler, a 21-year-old student and programmer, says he got the idea for the platform after his girlfriend's family members were trapped in Ukraine at the start of the war.

Bernard Merdler, a 21-year-old student and programmer, says he got the idea for the platform after his girlfriend’s family members were trapped in Ukraine at the start of the war.
(Fox News)

The idea of ​​a humanitarian project arose when Russia started the war with Ukraine at the end of February. Murdler’s girlfriend has family members trapped in the country, desperately looking for ways to stay up to date as events unfold.

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It was then that Mördler realized that he had to do something to help.

“I really came to the realization that the existing systems just aren’t enough and that I could try to do something better. So I came to the creation of the system itself, ”recalled Mördler.

A makeshift chapel in a bomb shelter, where nuns prepared to take shelter during air raids, at the Goshevsky convent, where nuns receive internally displaced persons fleeing the war, in Ivano-Frankivsk region, western Ukraine, Wednesday.  April 6, 2022 Mattresses, blankets and benches are also in the basement.  But even when there are no sirens, children enjoy using the cavernous underground space.

A makeshift chapel in a bomb shelter, where nuns prepared to take shelter during air raids, at the Goshevsky convent, where nuns receive internally displaced persons fleeing the war, in Ivano-Frankivsk region, western Ukraine, Wednesday. April 6, 2022 Mattresses, blankets and benches are also in the basement. But even when there are no sirens, children enjoy using the cavernous underground space.
(AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofti)

Ukraine Sirens Alert has thousands of daily users who also rely on the program for find shelter and places with Wi-Fi access on the way to safer places. More than 42,000 shelters have already been mapped on UASA.io.

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Through the site, Ukrainians can sign up for SMS and email alerts to be prepared for incoming fire. Very similar to Israeli red alert systemwhich was part of Merdler’s inspiration, messages can save lives in an emergency.

Bernard Merdler, a 21-year-old student and programmer, says he got the idea for the platform after his girlfriend’s family members were trapped in Ukraine at the start of the war.

As Russian attacks are on the rise, the price of alerting Ukrainians via SMS is growing. Merdler launched GoFundMe to help support the project.

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“I hope peace is around the corner and the conflict is over.” the killer said. “But until then, I’m going to just keep on, keep on innovating, trying to help as many people as possible.”