By 2050, cities along the Persian Gulf and on the east coast will have 10X more high tide days per year.

More than 56 million people live along the US East Coast and the Gulf. Mexico by 2050, the number of high tide days during high tides is projected to increase by at least 10 times due to rising sea levels as a result of changing of the climate.

The warning was disclosed in a report from the National Oceanic Administrative Association (NOAA), which said that since 2000, these regions have experienced an increase in high tide flooding (HTF) days by more than 150 percent.

Although dozens of coastal communities, cities in Virginia and Texas are expected to be hit the hardest, with water sloshing through the streets and bubbling from storm drains for up to 124 days a year. Eagle Point and Galveston Bay, Texas are projected to have up to 230 days in 2050 from the current five to six. days of HTS flooding per year.

As sea levels are projected to rise by one foot over the next 25 years, coastal cities across the country are expected to experience flooding an average of 45 to 70 times per year by 2050 – up from three to seven estimates in 2023. .

87 million people, or 29 percent of the US population, live in coastal counties, more than 41 million in the Atlantic and 32 million in the Pacific.

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By 2050, most of the east coast and Gulf states will have at least 10 times as many days.

A NOAA report warns that coastal cities along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico will experience 10 times as many days of flooding by 2050 (right) due to rising sea levels. This is compared to 2000 (left)

Eagle Point, Galveston Bay, Texas saw up to 30 days of HTF in 2020, but with rising sea levels, but could increase to 230 days by 2050.

Eagle Point, Galveston Bay, Texas saw up to 30 days of HTF in 2020, but with rising sea levels, but could increase to 230 days by 2050.

These statistics were published in the NOAA Annual Sea Level Rise Report. report this shows that flooding along the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf Coast is now twice as common as it was 22 years ago.

Tides differ from floods associated with natural disasters in that they are not as catastrophic, but events can force people living in coastal communities to leave their homes and move further inland.

HTFs, also known as “royal tides”, “nuisance” or “solar daytime” floods, are defined when the tides reach anywhere from 1.75 to two feet above the average daily tide and begin to spill onto the streets or bubble up from storm drains.

“As sea levels continue to rise, destructive flooding that occurred decades ago only during storms is now occurring more regularly, such as during a full moon or when prevailing winds or currents change,” NOAA said in a statement. Press release.

The map highlights the five largest coastal cities in the Persian Gulf and east coast, which by 2050 will have the most days of flooding during high tides.

The map highlights the five largest coastal cities in the Persian Gulf and east coast, which by 2050 will have the most days of flooding during high tides.

The data predict that sea levels will rise by one foot over the next 25 years.  This chart shows which areas will experience the highest level increases.

The data predict that sea levels will rise by one foot over the next 25 years. This chart shows which areas will experience the highest level increases.

Top 5 Eastern coastal cities with the most flood days per year by 2050

1. Lewisetta, Virginia: 141

2. Windmill Point, Virginia: 136

3. Annapolis, Maryland: 115

4. Solomon Islands, Maryland: 131.

5. Sewells Point, Virginia: 124

Eagle Point, Galveston Bay, Texas saw up to 30 days of HTF in 2020, but with rising sea levels, but could increase to 230 days by 2050.

Three different NOAA-controlled locations either equalized or interrupted previous HTF days from May 2021 to April 2022.

On the Atlantic coast, Reedy Point, Delaware broke its previous record with six events, and Springmaid Pier, South Carolina, near Myrtle Beach, set its 2021 record with 11 high tide floods.

And on the island of Kwajalein in the Pacific Ocean, four days of HTF were recorded, also one event more than in 2021.

However, lower EPR flooding along the US West Coast and Pacific Islands is associated with lingering La Niña effects, but this is only a temporary phenomenon.

This is a periodic meteorological phenomenon that affects the tracks of coastal storms and results in cooler-than-normal ocean surface temperatures and lower-than-normal sea-surface heights in parts of the Pacific Ocean, including the western United States.

Nicole LeBoeuf, Director of NOAA’s National Oceanic Service, said in a statement: “The East Coast and Gulf Coast are already experiencing twice as many days of high tide flooding compared to 2000, flooding coastlines, streets and basements and damaging critical infrastructure.

“As sea levels continue to rise, NOAA is committed to working with coastal communities to provide them with the tide gauge information and tools they need to address this issue, both now and in the coming years.”

Tides differ from floods associated with natural disasters in that they are not as catastrophic, but events can force people living in coastal communities to leave their homes and move inland.  The picture shows a man kayaking through the streets of Annapolis, Maryland, last October.

Tides differ from floods associated with natural disasters in that they are not as catastrophic, but events can force people living in coastal communities to leave their homes and move inland. The picture shows a man kayaking through the streets of Annapolis, Maryland, last October.

Pictured is high tide flooding in Grand Isle, Louisiana in 2021.  Experts predict that by 2050 the area will experience up to 201 days of flooding per year.

Pictured is high tide flooding in Grand Isle, Louisiana in 2021. Experts predict that by 2050 the area will experience up to 201 days of flooding per year.

Lewisetta, Virginia is another country in the top five most at risk, which could be up to 141 days from 10 in 2020.

Top 5 coastal cities in the Persian Gulf, which by 2050 will have the most floods in a year

1. Eagle Point, Galveston Bay, Texas: 230 people.

2. Grand Isle, Louisiana: 201

3. Galveston Pier 21, TX: 170

4. Morgans Point, Barbours Cut, TX: 134

5. Sabine Pass North, TX 125

LeBoeuf participated in a separate NOAA report on sea level rise released in February, and the report’s summary says that devastating flooding, typical of today’s sea levels, weather patterns and infrastructure, is expected to be more than 10 times more frequent next year. 30 years.

“Make no mistake: we are facing sea level rise,” she said.

In other words, according to LeBoeuf, one flood that could damage property or commerce in the coastal regions of the southeastern United States, on average every four to five years, will occur four to five times a year by 2050.

The projected rise is particularly worrisome given that in the 20th century, sea levels along the Atlantic coast rose at the fastest rate in 2,000 years.

However, the worst of long-term sea level rises from melting ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland probably won’t happen until 2100, said oceanographer William Sweet, lead author of the report.

Warmer water is expanding and melting ice sheets and glaciers are adding more water to the oceans.

The report is “the equivalent of NOAA raising a red flag” about accelerating sea level rise, said University of Wisconsin-Madison geologist Andrea Dutton, a sea level rise specialist who was not part of the federal report. The coastal flooding that is now happening in the US “will reach a whole new level in just a couple of decades.”

“We can see this freight train approaching from over a mile away,” Dutton said in an email. “The question is whether we continue to let houses slide into the ocean.”